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Vortexes?

Pro Member First Officer
leachus2002 First Officer

Hi,

Is it just me, or does FS2004 not give off vortexes on aircraft when you are coming into land or taking off?

Just a thought...

Leachus

Pro Member First Officer
JTH First Officer

What are vortexes?

Pro Member Chief Captain
Greekman72 Chief Captain

A spiral motion of fluid within a limited area, especially a whirling mass of water or air that sucks everything near it toward its center.(From google)

Pro Member Chief Captain
CrashGordon Chief Captain

JTH wrote:

What are vortexes?

Actually vortex is the singular and vortices is the plural. Doh!

Don Wood Guest

I don't know whether FS9 simulates vortices or not. However, if you are flying the airplane that generates them, you would not be able to feel them anway unless you made a rapid reversal of direction with a slight descent.

The google definition quoted is a good general one but is not aviation specific. In aviation, vortices are a cyclonic but mostly horizontal column of moving air generated off the wingtips of aircraft while the wing is developing lift. The larger and heavier the aircraft is, the stronger the vortices it develops.

These horizontal cyclones push outward from each wing tip and, like a cyclone, can be very violent. As they move away from the aircraft, they also settle, are pushed in the direction of the prevailing wind, and gradually disappear. Over time, and with more than a few crashes caused by vortices, the aviation community has learned that closely behind and below a large aircraft is a very dangerous place to be. Vortices are also the reason that especially heavy jets have the word "Heavy" appended to their radio call signs. The separation ATC must provide is greater for "heavy" aircraft than for large but lighter ones.

Pilots are also responsible for avoiding vortices, which can almost never be seen. The technique for doing that is to allow sufficient distance from any transport or large cargo aircraft and, on approach and landing, to remain slighly above the glide path of the large aircraft in front of you, keep at least three miles separation, and land on the runway at a spot further down the runway than the large aircraft touched down (remember, vortices only occur when a wing is developing lift).

I tend to doubt FS9 simulates them. I was recently flying an ILS approach to LAS and one of Microsoft's ATC glitches occured when a B-747 was cleared right over the top of my aircraft on short final. In the real world, that would have almost certainly generated an uncontrollable upset and crash. In sim, the C-172 didn't even flutter.

Pro Member First Officer
HardLanding First Officer

Deke Slayton, the Mercury astronaut, weighs in (from his bio "Deke!")

With real big airplanes people are prone to get into problems if they get too close to them. That's how they lost the XB-70 at Edwards in 1966. Joe Walker got too close to that thing without realizing it and got caught in tip vortices and whap! He smacked right into it.

HL

Pro Member Chief Captain
tomthetank Chief Captain

Some aircraft models come with the effect of vortices

Most of the aircraft from Ifdg have this effect which is operated by hitting the "I" key(the effect comes with the d/load as a seperate folder,the contents go in to the fs9 effects folder)

Arrow

IFDG (Now closed)downloadmain.php

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Just a quick question...

If a heavy aircraft flew threw a cloud while there were powerful wing vortices, would another pilot be able to see it?

Wink

Pro Member Captain
John Hodges (originalgrunge) Captain

So after reading Don's answer, are we talking about Wake Turbulence here? I've been cautioned on approach on VATSIM whenever a heavy is landing in front of me to be careful of the wake turbulence (and FS9 may not simulate it, but Active Sky sure does Wink ). Just wondering about the difference in terms

Pro Member First Officer
leachus2002 First Officer

Hi Guys,

Scarily enough, after approaching LGW in a snow storm, there are the vortexes. They must be listening to me........:p

Thanks
Leachus

Pro Member Chief Captain
Tailhook Chief Captain

originalgrunge wrote:

So after reading Don's answer, are we talking about Wake Turbulence here? I've been cautioned on approach on VATSIM whenever a heavy is landing in front of me to be careful of the wake turbulence (and FS9 may not simulate it, but Active Sky sure does Wink ). Just wondering about the difference in terms

Seeing that your post is older than 12 hrs by now, I wager you'll have dug out all the info on your own by now. Maybe someone else is interested as well... this is at least a start:

Arrow http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wake_turbulence

Arrow http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vortex

Read

Don Wood Guest

OriginalGrunge asked: "So after reading Don's answer, are we talking about Wake Turbulence here? I've been cautioned on approach on VATSIM whenever a heavy is landing in front of me to be careful of the wake turbulence (and FS9 may not simulate it, but Active Sky sure does ). Just wondering about the difference in terms."

Sorry it took so long to answer. I've been away from home visiting my grandkids.

The Wickepedia entries are accurate, however, more concisely, wake turbulence is any disturbance of the air caused by the passage of an aircraft.

Wingtip vortices are one of the primary causes of wake turbulence but not the only ones. You can also have wake turbulence caused by the displacement of air from the airframe, similar to the buffeting you feel when passing or being passed by a large truck or bus. The difference between Vortex induced wale turbulence and other types is that vortex flows are cyclonic, most others are not. Vortex induced turbulence is also by far the most dangerous. Close to the ground, it can cause an upset from which there is no time to recover. At higher altitudes, it can cause severe turbulence that may put unacceptable stresses on the airframe.

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