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Autopilot Approach Urgent Questions

Chief Captain
ceetee Chief Captain

I read through and printed out Joeleggs ILS approach guide some while ago and was having a flick through today and have some questions to ask.

1) When you are coming into land using ILS and you switch on the "APP" button on the autopilot panel, is the plane meant to just follow the ILS direction of attitude as well. I was lead to belive it decended down the glideslope to the runway, but I always have to decrease the altitude myself.

2) In the "stikcy" guide, it mentions:

If you have Autopilot, and you are using GPS to follow waypoints, switch the NAV/GPS button back to NAV!!!! YOU CANT FORGET TO DO THAT!!! YOU'LL BURN AND DIE IF YOU DONT!!

Well I don't use the GPS to follow waypoints, I just create an ILS flight plan from destination to destination so my NAV/GPS switch is always set ti NAV, is this correct?

3) Is it ok to keep the "APP" autopilot switch selected all the way down to the ground, while you manually change flaps and speed etc?

4) What is the "speedbrake" and "autobreak" and what setting (RTO, 1, 2, 3, MAX) should they be on and when. Sorry, I only know the very basics of heavy metal flying Embarassed

5) Contining on from my last question about not knowing much, could someone please explain what the "F/C" and "BC" buttons are on my panel (Screenshot below- I know the gauges are displaying there is alot wrong, I just wanted to take a quick demonstration picture)

I hope some people with the knowlage can help me, as I am planning a long haul flight tomoorow.

Cheers- CT

11 Responses

Pro Member First Officer
beerbadger First Officer

1) Make sure your on the GS, indicated normally by the green triangle shapped line going to the runway, it should dissconnect alt hold for that too.

2) you can do taht if you want i think =P

3) No you normally dissenge AP at 2500 ft ish.

4) Speedbrake used on landing to slow down press Shift+/ to arm at around 100ft for landing , set around 2 or 3 autobrake before landing depending on the lenth of runway and the plane.

5) I dont know ROFL

Hopfully that answers most of you questions ct 😂

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

1) If you have changed the NAV/GPS switch to NAV and you are close enough to the runway, and at around 2800 feet, and you engage APP on the AP, then it will control both axes for you, i.e. laterally and vertically. Disengage the AP at around 200 feet AGL, as it isn't an autoland feature.

2) It doesn't matter what your GPS/NAV switch is set to, as long as it is set to GPS for following waypoints, and to NAV for using the APP function on the AP. I guess from what you are saying, that you follow ATC's instructions?

3) It is ok to keep the APP switch on to around 200 feet. It isn't an autoland feature, and isn't supposed to be used below 200 feet. Disengage it here, and fly the last few seconds manually. Make sure you disengage AT at around 100 feet aswell. You can add flaps and and change speed whilst the AP is flying the approach for you.

4) No need to apologise. You need to arm your speed brakes (they are the spoilers that protrude from the top of the wing to destroy lift on landing) Press SHIFT and / to arm them - they will auto-deploy on landing. You can also use them in flight if you are going too fast, i.e. trying to reach 250 knots below 10000 when you are going too fast at 12000 feet for example.
Autobrakes depend on the conditions. On takeoff, you should set the autobrakes to RTO (Rejected Takeoff). If you are below V1 (decision speed) then you can cut the throttle and the wheels will be near locking to stop the aircraft quickly, i.e. an emergency stop.
For landing, 1 is for pleasent conditions, i.e. no rain, or high crosswinds / tailwinds / headwinds. 2 is the most common, it stops the aircraft in 'average' conditions, i.e. it doesn't stop the aircraft causing discomfort to passengers, and it doesn't take about 10 minutes to stop, so its the optimum level. If it is raining and the surface is wet / flooded, you need level 3 autobrake. This will apply a bit more power to the brakes to stop you. MAX is only used in emergencies where taking ages to stop will cause harm to the aircraft or passengers.

5) I think you mean F/D instead of F/C. The F/D is the Flight Director, and it shows you what is set into the AP, so basically provides you with a guide as to whether you should be flying higher or lower or to the left or right. You can see the pink lines in the middle of the PFD.
The B/C is the Back Course holder. This is similar to the ILS system but it maintains lateral stability for a non-precision approach for a runway that doesn't have ILS, but the other end of the runway does have an ILS. Does that make sense?

Basically, you have a runway with say, runway 09 and runway 27. Runway 27 has an ILS but runway 09 does not. Therefore, when approaching runway 09, you can use the Back course holder, which (I believe it only controls laterally, and doesn't descend for you) which will line you up with the runway using the ILS at the other end of the runway.

Maybe a real world pilot can be more specific and helpful with the explanation of back course holder.

Hope that helps a bit 😉

Guest

why the hell are you going 445 knots!!!! 😛 😛

Pro Member First Officer
antone First Officer

Anonymous wrote:

why the hell are you going 445 knots!!!! 😛 😛

Well, he did say that there was a lot wrong 😂

Chief Captain
ceetee Chief Captain

Thanks for clearing that up gents, I understand everything you said there.

I just have one question about this bit below though:

If you have changed the NAV/GPS switch to NAV and you are close enough to the runway, and at around 2800 feet, and you engage APP on the AP, then it will control both axes for you, i.e. laterally and vertically. Disengage the AP at around 200 feet AGL, as it isn't an autoland feature.

So I should only activate it at 2800 feet, not before, not after? Am I meant to disengage alitude hold on autopilot when I activate APP or keep it on untill 200feet AGL?

Pro Member Chief Captain
pilotwannabe Chief Captain

You don't have to engage APP mode at exactly 2800Ft, some controllers will even request that you decend to a lower altitude before intercepting the ILS. As for altitude hold, I always keep this engaged and the APP mode will automatically disengage it when you've intercepted the glidescope.

😉

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

The reason for activating it at around 2800 feet is that you must intercept the glideslope from below so anything from 2500 - 3000 feet is good, but obviously that depends on how far you are from the airport. If you have approach charts, then it will tell you at what altitude you must intercept the glideslope from. But from 10nm from the airport, 2800 feet should be a good time to engage the APP. Also, make sure your speed is 180 KIAS or below.

No, just engage the APP on the AP and it will hold your current altitude for a while, until the pink arrow starts to move down, indicating you are about to intercept the top of the glideslope. At this point, the AP should disengage the Alt. hold for you. You have to disengage the AP at 200 feet minimum around 500 feet to 1000 feet is desirable. Make sure you disengage the AT as well, or when you land, the aircraft will try to maintain the speed you have set in the MCP 😉

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

pilotwannabe wrote:

You don't have to engage APP mode at exactly 2800Ft, some controllers will even request that you decend to a lower altitude before intercepting the ILS. As for altitude hold, I always keep this engaged and the APP mode will automatically disengage it when you've intercepted the glidescope.

😉

Embarassed I was too slow

😉

Pro Member Chief Captain
pilotwannabe Chief Captain

🍻

Chief Captain
ceetee Chief Captain

Ah ok, thanks for the expanations.

FSNAV shows me all the info I need to know about where and when to intercept the glideslope from.

Thanks very much for all the help fellas 👍

Guest

Get yourself a decent airliner also. The default MS stuff is crap. The B737 from PMDG, the 747 from PMDG, and the 767 from LDS are the best you can buy. It is a HUGE learning curve though. The 747 manual is almost 500 pages thick! Every single system and switch is modelled exactly as it is in the real plane though. A great buy If you ask me.

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