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Can this be done?

Pro Member Trainee
deanos63 Trainee

Check out these!

Is it for real planes can land like this? and can it be done in fs9?

http://www.mypartypost.com/watchvideo/1025/Plane_Landing_Sideways

can this be done in fs9? this is just pure funny i can see it now, pilot says to co-pilot, "did you just hear a bang or something?"

http://www.mypartypost.com/watchvideo/2467/Planes_Tail_Falls_Off

and this is just pure scary!

http://www.mypartypost.com/watchvideo/1412/Scary_Plane_Takeoff

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Nice selection of videos 👍

As for the first one...yes, it is offered done in the real world. When a crosswind exists, aircraft are forced to crab by flying into the wind using the rudder to keep the ground track the same as the runway heading - obviously, the examples in that video aren't all that common - it can be done in FS9 aswell.

For the second video, I'm not sure of the circumstances it happened in, but it can't be done in that much detail in FS9 - you'd just crash on impact.

Lastly, you're very unlikely to experience it on a commercial airline flight 😂

😉

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jake (JarJarBinks) Chief Captain

for the first one yes ive seen it done and the B-52`s Landing gear can rotate so the plane can land so the plane can be pointed in a diff firection but the landing gear still facing the proper direction.

the second done i would believe it can happen it was probably a test to test the reactions of such planes if this event were to happen in the real world.

the third i highly doubt that you would experience this as Jolegg said Commercial pilots wouldnt be trained to do this and would certainly lose their job and possible even his/her licence.

otherwise cool vids 😉

Pro Member Chief Captain
RadarMan Chief Captain

After all the years of training and practicing that commercial pilots go through, crabbing never ceases to amaze me.
I wonder for them, is it easier to do than we think.

Radar

Pro Member Chief Captain
hinch Chief Captain

the second vid was a government test from the same era as the 'less flammable fuels' aircraft that blew up rather massively. both were remotely controled so no one was hurt Wink

the first vid just shows some amazing test pilot skill for that first 777, the last vid doesn't look real.

WantFSX Guest

I'm pretty sure the 3rd vid was a short field takeoff method....

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jake (JarJarBinks) Chief Captain

and nearly stall an A319?

Pro Member Captain
brownbox Captain

because of my dialup connection, im still waiting for the first one to load...buffering 10% complete... but anyways, i think it will be very interesting 🙄

Pro Member Captain
brownbox Captain

yay it loaded. lets see...
well the first one is beleivable to happen.
the second one... its really funny.
the third one.... what can i say?

in the 3rd one, i wonder why the aircraft didnt stall ❓

Pro Member Trainee
deanos63 Trainee

ok this may be boring some people so i'll just keep them in this post, i found this one as well.

http://www.mypartypost.com/watchvideo/2835/Plane_Off_Runway

Now what i wanna know is, what would the disciplinary procedure be for the crazy pilot in charge of this jumbo? would he be sacked? could the passengers sue?

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

This video has just been posted on the forums elsewhere. It was due to a brake failure - probably a fault in the hydraulic systems. Further investigation would determine whether the fault was due to lack of stringent aircraft checks (which would be the airlines' fault) or whether it was due to poor designing, which is unlikely, but in that case, it'd be Boeings' fault.

😉

Guest

Man, that take-off sure is amazing!

Doesn anybody know what plane is the one which loses it's tale? DC-30?

Pro Member Captain
Canyon (NoWorries) Captain

99jolegg wrote:

This video has just been posted on the forums elsewhere. It was due to a brake failure - probably a fault in the hydraulic systems. Further investigation would determine whether the fault was due to lack of stringent aircraft checks (which would be the airlines' fault) or whether it was due to poor designing, which is unlikely, but in that case, it'd be Boeings' fault.

😉

FWIW, the brakes are on their own hydraulic system, so even if you've lost the three other systems that control the flight controls, you'd be able to stop.

Since the brakes do not have a redundency, the parking brake is NOT on the brake system, they are run by the flight control hydraulic system, so if you lose brakes, you set the parking brake, burn a lot of rubber, and stop.

I think the problem with the 747 was probably an anti-skid issue, possibly one tire locked up, and therefore the brakes wouldn't engage all the way.

As for cross-wind landings, they sure don't look safe, and I don't think it's fair to say they are easy, but in flight simulator, they are cake, after you crash a plane or seven...

That Airbus take-off looks like an autopilot malfunction, I only say that because I've had it happen to me in the game. You set everything up for an autopilot departure, and the plane lifts off about twenty feet and levels off, it's scary, and no-matter what you do with the stick, the plane is perfectly content to fly by the autopilot and ignore your inputs, especially on a fly-by-wire plane like the A319. That crazy pull-up at the end was the pilot disengaging the autopilot.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

NoWorries wrote:

99jolegg wrote:

This video has just been posted on the forums elsewhere. It was due to a brake failure - probably a fault in the hydraulic systems. Further investigation would determine whether the fault was due to lack of stringent aircraft checks (which would be the airlines' fault) or whether it was due to poor designing, which is unlikely, but in that case, it'd be Boeings' fault.

😉

FWIW, the brakes are on their own hydraulic system, so even if you've lost the three other systems that control the flight controls, you'd be able to stop.

Since the brakes do not have a redundency, the parking brake is NOT on the brake system, they are run by the flight control hydraulic system, so if you lose brakes, you set the parking brake, burn a lot of rubber, and stop.

I think the problem with the 747 was probably an anti-skid issue, possibly one tire locked up, and therefore the brakes wouldn't engage all the way.

Thanks - I know very little about hydraulic systems Embarassed 😉

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jake (JarJarBinks) Chief Captain

NoWorries wrote:

I think the problem with the 747 was probably an anti-skid issue, possibly one tire locked up, and therefore the brakes wouldn't engage all the way.

that plus little traction and possible hydraulic leak which made the aircraft on the ground uncontrolable

Pro Member Trainee
wscott52 Trainee

RadarMan wrote:

After all the years of training and practicing that commercial pilots go through, crabbing never ceases to amaze me.
I wonder for them, is it easier to do than we think.

Radar

I've done it in Cessnas with very little flying experience, it's not very hard as long as you think about where the plane is in relation to the runway and don't worry about what it looks like. In Cessnas at least you do need to kick in a little opposite rudder right before touichdown so you land with the wheels pointed in the right direction. The harder one for me was side slipping on final to stay aligned with the runway. By using rudder and bank the plane stays pointed in the right direction it's just not level.

Madbrit Guest

The first video is aircraft being deliberately put into a crab to test side loading on the landing gear. As wscott52 says, pilots will use either the crab or slip method for crosswind landings. The crab is more often used with a ‘kick out’ of the rudder just before touchdown. The slip method can be more uncomfortable for the passengers.

Second video is a structural test for heavy landings.

Third video is a short field takeoff where the aircraft is rotated early to around 50 feet where it is leveled off until climb out speed can be achieved. (Standard short field procedure learned by all pilots). The steep climb is a demonstration of its power most likely at an airdisplay or as part of a test flight.

The 747 was probably aquaplaning if it wasn’t a brake failure.

Pro Member First Officer
PH First Officer

1st and second agree with what explanation is offered. No.3 obviously not a commercial flight carrying pax! Promo for Eurowings out of a 4000ft field in Germany, limited fuel no payload. I can imagine the computers going whooooooa! what the hells going on! This should not be happening! Syntax error! Although it is impressive I expect the actual angle of climb is not as steep as it looks. Difficult to see if any flap is selected.

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