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do u think you can fly?

Pro Member Captain
brownbox Captain

I hope everyone here at flyaway has had a nice time flying in fs2004. Now the question is, do you think you would be able to fly a real aircraft, from takeoff to landing? 😎

48 Responses

Pro Member Chief Captain
Michael Thomas (SteveT) Chief Captain

I will probably be able to fly it...but everyone onboard would probably die 😂

Pro Member Captain
Karlw Captain

yes try getting the pmdg 747 REALISTIC!!!!!!!!!!!!

It has an fmc which my freind who flys 777's say's it's very realistic so my answer is possibly

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Depends on the aircraft. A Cessna, or another small aircraft, then maybe yes (with clear weather). Anything larger and multi-engine then no - theres a reason airline pilots train for years and cover every eventuality.

😉

Pro Member Captain
brownbox Captain

i know my way around the simulator but if it comes to flying a real aircraft, i dont even know where the reverse thrust switch is Embarassed

Pro Member Chief Captain
Michael Thomas (SteveT) Chief Captain

If I were in the controls of fighter jet, sitting inside the aircraft on the runway, cleared for takeoff...I would panic so much that I would probably press the eject button...bearing in mind I am still on the ground ❗

😂 😂

Pro Member Captain
PanAmerican Captain

If it is a 727, 737, or 747, then I have no problem with the aircraft.

Pro Member First Officer
antone First Officer

Straight answer: No 😂

Well, I guess I'd do a bit better than someone who's never played MSFS and has no interest in aviation, but we'd still crash and burn horribly.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Greekman72 Chief Captain

I only can fly an AN-225. Liar Liar Liar
All the other crafts are boring for me... 😉 😂 😂 😂

Pro Member Captain
Jared Captain

Well let me just say guys that flying in real life is indeed very different than in flight simulator. So don't just assume that because you've mastered an airplane in FS you can go and fly it in real life. Me I could fly and I have flown already in real life and it is different.

P.S. I know in a post about a month ago I said that i would be leaving this forum. Well I did lie and I only mean to say that I wasn't going to be flying FS anymore, well at least for a while. It's nice to be back.

Pro Member First Officer
violentviolet First Officer

At a push i might be able to fly something like the cessna 152,as i have had a lesson in one.Anything bigger and i'm inviting my innards to be pebble dashed all over the countryside. Blink
P.S...Even while in the Cessna i was "bricking" it! Fear

Pro Member Trainee
deanos63 Trainee

If the stewardess on the plane said "attention ladies and gentleman, both pilot and co-pilot have suddenly died is their anyone on board that can fly A plane?" I would probably raise my hand and say "YES" safe in the knowledge that I am the only person that knows i haven't, except for the experience i have had with MS Flight Simulator 2004 and FSPassengers.

First thing i would look for is the button that gets the stewards to serve "drinks and sandwhiches" and hope my customers satisfaction rating increases!

Pro Member Chief Captain
hinch Chief Captain

brownbox - if you take a look on the throttle there are two smaller levers attached and below. they swing up over the throttle handles and you pull them back. that's for boeing aircraft anyway and it was a crap description.

my friend with the ppl says i could fly a 172 😛

Pro Member First Officer
antone First Officer

There was a case a few years ago. They did an experiment in Scandinavia using a SAS full-motion simulator. A guy was able to take off, fly and land it successfully. His only training was MSFS.

I believe the aircraft was an A320, but I wouldn't swear to that.

Pro Member Chief Captain
CrashGordon Chief Captain

antone wrote:

There was a case a few years ago. They did an experiment in Scandinavia using a SAS full-motion simulator. A guy was able to take off, fly and land it successfully. His only training was MSFS.

I believe the aircraft was an A320, but I wouldn't swear to that.

Well, I believe that answers the question if someone who has used one simulator can fly another simulator.

As for those who think they can fly a 737 or larger based only on FS, I think they are sadly mistaken.

That said, if I were on an airliner where the crew became incapacitated and there were no other pilots on board, I would take a crack at it. If I was unable to land the plane, it wouldn't be any different than if I didn't try.

The difference is, if I tried, I'd know the correct time to say, "Oh $%#@". 😂 😂 😂 😂

Pro Member First Officer
violentviolet First Officer

CrashGordon wrote:

antone wrote:

There was a case a few years ago. They did an experiment in Scandinavia using a SAS full-motion simulator. A guy was able to take off, fly and land it successfully. His only training was MSFS.

I believe the aircraft was an A320, but I wouldn't swear to that.

Well, I believe that answers the question if someone who has used one simulator can fly another simulator.

As for those who think they can fly a 737 or larger based only on FS, I think they are sadly mistaken.

That said, if I were on an airliner where the crew became incapacitated and there were no other pilots on board, I would take a crack at it. If I was unable to land the plane, it wouldn't be any different than if I didn't try.

The difference is, if I tried, I'd know the correct time to say, "Oh $%#@". 😂 😂 😂 😂

ROFL True.

Pro Member First Officer
spitfiresrule First Officer

I can fly but only a cessna 152 and Diamond 20 as those are the only planes I have had lessons in. Other than that nope lol

Pro Member Captain
brownbox Captain

ahhh i see the reverse thrust switch in the vc of the ifly 747 i beleive 😀

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jake (JarJarBinks) Chief Captain

i am prabably capable of flying an aircraft like a cessna i could probably fly it but im unsure of the outcome 🙄

Pro Member First Officer
oreo005 First Officer

hmmmmmmmmmm.... nope. I still need alot of practice! I could probabley take off good in a small aircraft like the cessna. But, I still need tons of practice (may i say again, TONS, 😂 )!

(oh, and also help bunny (below) gain world domination!!!)



Last edited by oreo005 on Thu Jul 13, 2006 3:16 am, edited 2 times in total
Pro Member Trainee
Graham (graham05) Trainee

Yes for sure

Pro Member Captain
brownbox Captain

hmmm but when i think about it, how hard could it be? only landing would be a problem Crying or Very sad everyone knows how to increase throttle in a 747. Everyone knows how to pull up and everyone knows how to put the gear up. 😎

Pro Member Trainee
Brian B. (valcan222) Trainee

well if it was in a cessna 172 then yes I would lol, seeing that I do it more than once a week, but chances are that if I was in a cessna 172 I would be the one flying it so no need to worry because if the pilot and co pilot die in the cessna 172 then I would be dead so no need to worry LOL 😉 but if I were in say a 737 I belive I could take off and fly, landing well not so much lol.

Pro Member First Officer
antone First Officer

CrashGordon wrote:

antone wrote:

There was a case a few years ago. They did an experiment in Scandinavia using a SAS full-motion simulator. A guy was able to take off, fly and land it successfully. His only training was MSFS.

I believe the aircraft was an A320, but I wouldn't swear to that.

Well, I believe that answers the question if someone who has used one simulator can fly another simulator.

As for those who think they can fly a 737 or larger based only on FS, I think they are sadly mistaken.

That said, if I were on an airliner where the crew became incapacitated and there were no other pilots on board, I would take a crack at it. If I was unable to land the plane, it wouldn't be any different than if I didn't try.

The difference is, if I tried, I'd know the correct time to say, "Oh $%#@". 😂 😂 😂 😂

It answers more questions than that. Granted, the guy was not asked to deal with engine problems or other failures (not that I'm aware of) but a full-motion simulator is a very different animal from MSFS. Airline pilots aren't passed to fly real planes unless they can fly one of these.

Now they probably picked an FS genius to do the test, but do any FS fans really believe they would do a worse job than the Average Joe at the controls of anything?

Pilau Guest

I started taking driving lessons (driving, not flying!) last week (congrats me!), and after 6 years of driving and racing a lot on my PC, I have to say that this kind of experience helps you when you get to the real deal.

Some of my friends has and had a lot of trouble with driving a car, I didn't, I'm quite natural at this. (not showing off but here's my point🙂 After pracitcing many hours on the sim, even if it's not a full-motion sim, you're well experienced.

I'm still a newbie on FS2004, I admit it. But experience is someting you gain through, the way Rod said it, "Practice, practice, practice".

Pro Member Trainee
wscott52 Trainee

brownbox wrote:

I hope everyone here at flyaway has had a nice time flying in fs2004. Now the question is, do you think you would be able to fly a real aircraft, from takeoff to landing? 😎

I have flown in Cessna 152s solo and in several friends GA aircraft. A real aircraft is very different than the sim. The controls respond differently, there's immediate feedback in the motion of the plane, and you can actually see better because you can turn your head and use your peripheral vision. You must use the rudder pedals, there is no autorudder. I flew in the mid to late 1980s and did not have FS. The version at the time was very primitive anyway. I think, and CFIs agree, FS2004 can help but your chance of going directly from the siim to even a small GA aircroft and flying it just around the field is going to be pretty small. Landing in the sim can be tricky, it's much harder in real life. It gets easier with practice but the first dozen or so times you do it you really need someone next to you helping you through it. If you were to get into a larger multiengine or jet aircraft I think your chance would be even slimmer. If you have a chance take an introductory flying lesson and try to imagine doing it from start to finish with no one else there.

Pro Member Captain
jarred_01 Captain

These sort of topics drive me up the wall, I would highly doubt any of you here would have the ability to land a plane safely.

I've had 11 flying lessons at around 8 hours flight time, yet I wouldn't feel comfortable having to land a plane with no one elses input - I think it's time you guys realise that just because you can land a plane on a computer, it doesn't mean you can do it in real life.

In fact, I would be suprised if many of you would even no how to start a 152 engine - let alone fly a plane.

Pro Member Captain
brownbox Captain

start a 152 engine Umm... my first guess would be toooooooooo..... Crying or Very sad
no idea, i barely even know how to on the simulator

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

jarred_01 wrote:

These sort of topics drive me up the wall, I would highly doubt any of you here would have the ability to land a plane safely.

I've had 11 flying lessons at around 8 hours flight time, yet I wouldn't feel comfortable having to land a plane with no one elses input - I think it's time you guys realise that just because you can land a plane on a computer, it doesn't mean you can do it in real life.

In fact, I would be suprised if many of you would even no how to start a 152 engine - let alone fly a plane.

All very true, but the question is, whether people could actually do it, not whether they'd feel comfortable doing it.

😉

Pro Member First Officer
PH First Officer

Interesting thread...I think there is a big difference in being able to fly a plane as a one off ie the crew incapacitated "Hollywood style" student pilot/flight simmer saves the day compared to line pilot flying several sectors a day in all sorts of weather. I challenge anybody to fly a twin engine aircraft, accurately, on a single engine NDB approach to decision height in limited vis.
The bigger picture and the reason most pilots are so well trained is there is more to flying then take off, cruise and land. Although computers do most planning one still must be aware of ac performance, weather amongst other things.
So really the answer to your question is most could fly in a one off on a nice day but if the **** hit the fan it may well be totally different.

Pro Member Captain
Sean (SeanGa) Captain

I think I'd be able to take off, fly, and land a plane without any casualties especially if I received some help from the ground and used the FMC, but manually I have no idea..

my guess is that I would be able to fly a plane in the best possible conditions, but any single failure or strange situation would probably ruin my flight..

Pro Member Chief Captain
hinch Chief Captain

jarred_01 wrote:

In fact, I would be suprised if many of you would even no how to start a 152 engine - let alone fly a plane.

i can 🙂

Guest

...Well, there have been reports of cases in which the pilot of a litte Cessna or so died in a heart attack and whoever was up there with him was successfully guided back to the airport and the runway and did survive the whole thing. 😳
So, if you are lucky enough, have perfect weather, some good guidance, NO other failures, the correct frequency tuned from the beginning, and if the Reaper just happens to be on a coffee break that moment, you might get to live to tell the tale... 😕

Well, simmers on the other hand at least know that four red lights next to the runway are not a good sign and they know how to read the most important cockpit instruments.
In good weather, everyone could see, where the plane is going, but imagine flying in a completely black night or in fog or something like that. While everyone in the cabin would be staring out the windows without seein anything, you in the cockpit would know
-that the altimeter is NOT supposed to spin around counter-clockwise too fast,
-that the needle of the vertical speed indicator should be pointing more to the left that to the bottom right
-that there should be a reasonable amout of blue area visible on the round thing in the middle, and
-that the strange alarm probably doesn't mean anything good.

...So I guess it comes down to what CrashGordon wrote:

CrashGordon wrote:

The difference is, if I tried, I'd know the correct time to say, "Oh $%#@". 😂 😂 😂 😂

😀 😀 😀 😀

Pro Member Trainee
Erdling Trainee

...whoops, wasn't logged in. Anyways, I do know that I enjoy flying FS, so guess what I'm gonna do now...

Pro Member Captain
Sean (SeanGa) Captain

Erdling wrote:

...whoops, wasn't logged in. Anyways, I do know that I enjoy flying FS, so guess what I'm gonna do now...

eat?

Pro Member Captain
Sam (SamIntel) Captain

jarred_01 wrote:

These sort of topics drive me up the wall, I would highly doubt any of you here would have the ability to land a plane safely.

I've had 11 flying lessons at around 8 hours flight time, yet I wouldn't feel comfortable having to land a plane with no one elses input - I think it's time you guys realise that just because you can land a plane on a computer, it doesn't mean you can do it in real life.

In fact, I would be suprised if many of you would even no how to start a 152 engine - let alone fly a plane.

I agree with you 100%. Real life is soooo different than the sim, it is like driving a car in real life and driving a car in a driving game.

Pro Member Trainee
KEEGAN GRIFFIN (KEEGAN) Trainee

i can fly 737 757 and i`m learning the 747
also md 80
i had a go on a harrier and a f16 they was just mad compared to any other aircraft

Pilau Guest

In real life or in a sim...? 😕

Pro Member Trainee
calum Trainee

I've had a couple of lessons in a Cessna. It was very similar to msfs. The controls in the Cessna were very sensitive though. Much more than even with them set to max sensitivity on msfs.

The other difference was the cessna really moves around a lot with wind and turbulence. I suppose your house would have to shake to replicate that.

Pro Member Trainee
Gukken Trainee

lol, the thought of me in a airplane in the pilot seat always makes me laugh because of the successrate is somewhere around 0-1% (I think, in FS it's around 70-80% with the learning cessna). Though.. I've just started flying serious and I'm moving my way up to commercial lessons now (I still have to repeat some old leassons from time to time).
They always say that even a "normal" person could fly a aircraft in situations were the pilots been disabled to fly. I however doubt this to be true since I've never been able to land a jet with realistic settings on.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Cheeks Chief Captain

Gukken just a friendly reminder not to post to old posts 😉. Dont worry when i was new to the forums i done it all the time Embarassed 😂

Pro Member Chief Captain
Drew B (belgeode) Chief Captain

Lol... good point Cheeks... but you know what this is an interesting thread though!

I wonder if I could. I have flown a Cessna... albeit briefly, and I am going to be taking lessons in the near future, but in a what if situation like what was proposed?

Make sure I have a manual as to how to turn on the autopilot and how to make the plane autoland ILS. A very patient ATC controller would help too... And IF I make it alive, make sure I have a LARGE bottle of vodka waiting for me at the airport... I am gonna need it to unwind.

For now, I'll stick to FS2004 commercial jets.

Pro Member First Officer
KevinTsai First Officer

I think it's possible that I could fly a Cessna but not in bad and/or foggy weather.

I really want to own a small aircraft when I grow up.

If a plane was hijacked, I would punch the lights out of the terrorists and if they killed or subdued the pilots, I would be the captain and my brother would be the copilot. I think I could land a jetliner safely though I would be pretty nervous. Same thing for flying a Cessna.

Hey, did you know that some planes cost less than $100,000 in new condition? However, only 1 person could fly the plane only and take another passenger or two up with them. I read it in one of the airplane magazines.

Pro Member Chief Captain
VegasFlyer Chief Captain

Old Cessna 172 Skyhawks can be bought for even less money. 😉

Pro Member Captain
nottobe Captain

I think it's more a psychological thing than actual skill that keeps you from flying properly in a real plane. I flew a real 172 a few hours, after couple years of simulating. I found the most different thing is the fear and panic. this was added by the motion in a real plane. I was nervous about doing everything fearing that any mistake would make it last day of my life....
Plus the turbulence and lateral movement (especially at landing GS) made me quite distracted, but I always had an instructor by me......

Pro Member First Officer
mossy First Officer

Well if I was in some sightseeing tour in a cessna 172 or a similar aircraft and the pilot had a heart attack or something equally incapacitating I might give it a shot. I reckon I could get the plane on the runway in one peice but any other passengers would have to fork out millions in phsycologist fees to cure them of thier terrible fear of anything with wings. 😀

Pro Member Captain
Doyley Captain

I've had a good few hours in a real Piper Tomahawk now, although I've not made any solo flights I think that I would be fine, with help from the ATC, if something did happen to my instructor.

Flying in FS is completely different to flying in real life, even with all sorts of addons and equipment. In the plane that I fly you don't have autopilot, GPS or sod all to fall back on if it gets a little bumpy up there, all that you have is a trim wheel and even that acts differently in real life than in FS.

The only advantage that I took into my lessons was knowing that in instruments did. But even they act differently in real life. You have to check your directional indicator regularly, you can't just press B and the altimeter will set itself to the correct barometer reading. The vertical speed indicator isn't too reliable, there is a delay on it so you could fall a couple of hundred feet on the altimeter with the vertical speed indicator still saying your climbing.

And then you have the effects of the weather on the A/C. There is nothing more disorientating than a crosswind catching your tail and feeling your body spin, or the effect of just a couple of G's on your body after pulling up from a rapid descent (I don't know how aerobatic pilots do it). It felt like my brains were going into my feet.

Pro Member Trainee
Prozac919 Trainee

I can answer this question because I have done it. The answer is NO. I recently was hired by a major carrier in the US. I was hired about 8 months before I showed up to training. I purchased a PMDG product and practiced on it. Did it help. Not really. I had 20 years flying in the military, plus practiced w/ MSFS. My first couple weeks on the line were pretty tough and I don't think MSFS helped at all. I even had the advantage of 20 years flying experience. I have flown four types of complex aircraft for real. Each time I change aircraft, it is a challenge. So, if you folks think you can fly a real aircraft based on JUST MSFS, you are fooling yourself. I hope this doesn't sound arrogant because I don't mean it that way. The aircraft in MSFS don't model the real aircraft very well.

Pro Member Captain
acepilot32 Captain

i agree with you Prozac919 msfs doesnt help that much becasue ive been in a boeing 757-200 and let me tell you it is crazy! i only knowed what some of the instruments are for and how they work but if the pilots passed out on a airplane i was on and no one else knew how to fly id give a crack at it even though itll end up in a fireball on the runway who knows maybe ill get lucky and land it succesfully

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