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Wind Direction

Jamie4590 Guest

If I use the facility to change the wind direction to 45 degres or 270 degrees is this replecating the effets of wind shear and if I set the wind angle to 000 degrees is this headwind and 180 degrees tailwind?

I'm trying to learn how to handle the different directions and of wind. Any tips would be great.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Changing the wind direction in the real world or FS has nothing to do with windshear. The wind direction defined by either a METAR in the real world or the weather section in FS9 and dictates a near constant wind direction. If you change the wind direction in FS9, then you have that constant wind, plus if you select it, windshear (varying degrees) within the friction layer.

If you set the wind to 000 or 180 degrees then it is head or tail wind depending on the direction you are facing. When a wind direction is listed, it is coming from that direction.

The way I remember it is from the amount of times, on a freezing cold day, you hear "northerly wind" i.e. wind from the Arctic. Clearly, the wind must be coming from the north, rather than going to the North otherwise it'd be hot and not minus something.

I'm not too sure what you mean by learning how to handle different directions of wind Dont Know

Hope that helps a bit.

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Sean (SeanGa) Captain

I find it kind of stupid, because "wind direction" according to the language means where the wind is heading, not where it is coming from. confusing Confused

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Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

SeanGa wrote:

I find it kind of stupid, because "wind direction" according to the language means where the wind is heading, not where it is coming from. confusing Confused

Not necessarily. It is only confusing because people most often talk about direction when they point to a direction, rather than pointing from a direction. A direction can come from or go to anywhere - its just the former is less common outside of aviation.

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Sean (SeanGa) Captain

Are you sure? As far as I have understood a direction only goes TO something. I can say "I came FROM that direction" but then my finger will be pointing towards where I came from - in other words TO.

So I still believe it is wrong to say that the wind direction is 180 deg when it is heading towards 000 deg. I would say it like this: The wind direction is not 180 deg, but it came from that direction.

Imagine I am standing in the middle of two places, town and my house. The town is situated at 180 deg and my house at 000 deg. If I walk towards town, do I say my direction is my house (000 deg)? Of course not, that would be wrong.My direction would be town because I am heading towards town.

If this is very wrong then please slap me hard, but to me it still seems like I am right!

EDIT: My Penguin Wordmaster Dictionnary says:

Direction: The point towards which something moves; way to somewhere

Jamie4590 Guest

So the facility on the weather screen where you can adjust the angle of the wind direction means the wind goes in that direction constantly.

I never realised the wind is constant. I've been flying with a light wind at 29 degrees which has been forcing the aircraft to the left of the runway so that explains why.

Its frustrating that the weather settings apply throughout the whole flight. Without using real world weather (I'm not online) or changing inflight is there anyway to pre select different weather settings for the departure and arrival?

Also, what is a realistic min-max cloud coverage? Sometimes I set it to 2000ft - 14000ft as I like breaking out of the clouds to see the runway right in front of me.

Why arnt the ILS loc and GS signals or the TCAS affected by heavy clouds?

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

No, it means the wind comes from that direction. For example a wind identified as 27008 means the wind is travelling East (090) at 08kts.

I don't know of any way for changing the weather for arrival and departure airports apart from doing it manually.

Cloud are a lot more complicated than a min-max coverage. It depends on a lot of factors. If the temperature is say +10C and the dew point is +9C then expect low misty cloud (due to low saturation which I'll explain more if you'd like) for a long distance where that temperature and dew point occurs. Similarly, in a built up area with rising parcels of warm air and a low dew point, then you can expect cloud base of around 2000ft and towering cumulonimbus of 14000ft with a lot of turbulence. There isn't really a realistic set of cloud formations.

ILS signals are powerful radio frequency waves between 108112 MHz, similar to radio communcation waves in general aviation. As long as the line of sight isn't obscured then it'll remain unaffected. Cloud isn't dense enough to stop high energy waves - it travels straight through. The same goes for TCAS I'd imagine.

Jamie4590 Guest

As always succinct and insightful. Thumbs Up!

Jamie4590 Guest

Yesterday I had the wind angle set at 29 degrees and when I encountered it the aircraft was pushed north east. This clarifies that the wind direction is indeed 'to' the degree angle. The wind circle in the weather settings menu is misleading because the small arrow inside it points to the center of the circle which made me think a wind setting of 29 degrees would be travelling south west. Not so.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Jamie4590 wrote:

Yesterday I had the wind angle set at 29 degrees and when I encountered it the aircraft was pushed north east. This clarifies that the wind direction is indeed 'to' the degree angle. The wind circle in the weather settings menu is misleading because the small arrow inside it points to the center of the circle which made me think a wind setting of 29 degrees would be travelling south west. Not so.

Really? I've never noticed. It seems strange that they'd do something in the complete opposite to real world aviation, especially when its so easy to rectify Dont Know

Pro Member Captain
Sean (SeanGa) Captain

Jamie4590 wrote:

Yesterday I had the wind angle set at 29 degrees and when I encountered it the aircraft was pushed north east. This clarifies that the wind direction is indeed 'to' the degree angle. The wind circle in the weather settings menu is misleading because the small arrow inside it points to the center of the circle which made me think a wind setting of 29 degrees would be travelling south west. Not so.

I think there is something wrong with FS... I have had problems with the wind myself before. While in the air when it said the wind was heading 90 deg it was heading 90 deg, but when I approached the airport or while I was on the ground, it changed direction (270 deg). pretty strange...

spad Guest

Wind direction in aviation is always given in reference to the direction that the wind in comeing from. Any movement of the aircraft, in reference to the ground, toward the wind has another cause.

Jamie4590 Guest

This wind issue is confusing. Especially as there are various wind settings such as turbulance, windshear, constant wind etc.

Tonight, I perform a series of structured experements. Idea

Pro Member Captain
Sean (SeanGa) Captain

Jamie4590 wrote:

This wind issue is confusing. Especially as there are various wind settings such as turbulance, windshear, constant wind etc.

Tonight, I perform a series of structured experements. Idea

Good luck and don't forget to post the results!

Pro Member Chief Captain
CRJCapt Chief Captain

WIND
METAR KLAX 140651Z AUTO 00000KT 1SM R35L/4500V6000FT -RA BR BKN030 10/10
A2990 RMK AO2

The wind element is reported as a five-digit group (six digits if speed is over 99 knots). The first three
digits are the direction from which the wind is blowing in tens of degrees referenced to true north.
Directions less than 100 degrees are preceded with a zero. The next two digits are the average speed in
knots, measured or estimated, or if over 99 knots, the next three digits.
Example:
340105KT
If the wind speed is less than 3 knots, the wind is reported as calm, 00000KT. If the wind is gusty, 10
knots or more between peaks and lulls, G denoting gust is reported after the speed followed by the
highest gust reported. The abbreviation KT is appended to denote the use of knots for wind speed.
Other countries may use kilometers per hour or meters per second.

In Flight Simulator, and in the ATIS, the wind direction is in reference to magnetic north. Smile

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