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Very sad :(

Pro Member Captain
Karlw Captain

Even years aftre this disaster it still is a big deal very sad Crying or Very sadCrying or Very sadCrying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=1869965306309274497&q=space+shuttle&hl=en

Please leave a coment for memory of these 7 brave people Crying or Very sad

Jamie4590 Guest

Very sad indeed. After the take-off some junior members of staff at NASA reported to their managers that they identified a foam strike to the left wing and wanted to commission satellite pictures of the shuttle to asses the damage. Tragically their request was denied by their managers. There was also some scare mongering during the investigation that NASA ignored it because they felt there would have been nothing they could do as a rescue attempt or repair would have been impossible. I stress not my opinion, opinion of NASA employees.

Since the accident one of the procedures introduced is to take several satellite photos of the shuttle in orbit to asses damage from foam strikes.

I watched an interesting docu where it said NASA were reluctant to hand over the leading edge panels of the wings for investigative experiments because they cost $100,000 each! In the end they did and they used the machine that replicates the effect of a bird strike on an aircraft (basically shoots it out) The first test where they fired a piece of foam at section 5 of the wing only left slight scratches so it seemed to be a dead end. Then they did the same test on section 6 of the wing and it smashed it apart. This allowed super heated gases to enter the shuttle. Watching the actual footage of mission control when the shuttle developed problems and finally went off-line was very saddening. It shows the flight director saying "lock the doors" which signals the beginning of an investigation. 😞

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