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Guest 5549 Guest

I have a hypothetical situation for you fine pilots to try and answer. Any help would be appreciated.
Say you're cleared to land at an airport but there is loads of cloud so you need to use ILS. What if there isn't ILS and it has to be a visual landing. Is there a device that can aid you in landing on visual runways? I've heard of LOC and DME. What does that mean and how do you use it?
I think it's cool and challenging to have lots of mist or something blocking the view but ti would be nice to use an instrument if its a visual landing.
Thanks

Pro Member Chief Captain
CRJCapt Chief Captain

Guest 5549 wrote:

I have a hypothetical situation for you fine pilots to try and answer. Any help would be appreciated.
Say you're cleared to land at an airport but there is loads of cloud so you need to use ILS. What if there isn't ILS and it has to be a visual landing. Is there a device that can aid you in landing on visual runways? I've heard of LOC and DME. What does that mean and how do you use it?
I think it's cool and challenging to have lots of mist or something blocking the view but ti would be nice to use an instrument if its a visual landing.
Thanks

1. LOC is short for localizer. It's the lateral guidance portion of the ILS. Some airports on have the localizer and not the full ILS. It's used for instrument approaches but the minimum altitude is higher than an ILS. There is no vertical guidance on the localizer approach.

2. DME is Short for Distance Measuring Equipment. This gives you slant range from you aircraft to the selected navigation aid that is equipped with DME. It could be a VOR, LOC, VORTAC and sometimes a NDB.

3. If the runway does not have an ILS or other instrument approach, you have to be able to see the runway in order to land. There are certain visibility and cloud separation limits also. Instrument approaches exist using a VOR, GPS, NDB, LOC, LOC-BC, ILS. Some have DME, some don't.

http://www.navfltsm.addr.com/index.htm

Guest Guest

And may I also add something...

If the airport is so equipped, you can utilize the VASI or PAPI to provide you with visual information with regards to your glidepath in relation to the runway. It will tell you if you're coming in too high, too low or on glideslope. Just apply the appropriate corrections to bring you back on the correct glidepath for a safe landing.

Also, if the airport is so equipped, you can utilize the VOR or NDB/RMI to line your plane up with the active runway by intercepting the radial that corresponds with the runway's orientation.

For example:

Active Runway: RWY 06
Heading: 060
VOR: OBS set to 060 (To)

If the wind is calm, you should be able to line your plane up with the active runway, then utilize the VASI or PAPI for glideslope information.

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