Fly Away Simulation
SearchSearch 

250 KTAS Below 10'000ft Question

Jamie4590 Guest

How strict is the rule that you cannot exceed 250 KTAS below 10'000ft?

If I went even just slightly above it during climb or was at, for example, 270 KTAS as I descended past 10'000ft would it lead to all kinds of form filling and reprimands? Could there be instances where if the pilot informed ATC of the exessive speed he could be cleared and avoid any violations?

Pro Member Chief Captain
CRJCapt Chief Captain

The speed limit is for safety reasons. If you exceeded 250 by a small amount, doubtful that ATC would even notice. ATC only has your ground speed not your airspeed. Good pilots fly by the rules because it's the right thing to do even if the chance of being caught is small. In an emergency, the pilot has the authority to break any regulation. If the design of the aircraft prevents the pilot from adhering to speed restrictions, you are not required to comply. Under special circumstances, The FAA can grant a wavier for excessive speed. The flight would have to be a special flight segregated from other public flight for the purpose of flight testing, record attempts or other special purposes.Smile

91.117 Aircraft speed.
(a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator, no person may operate an aircraft below 10,000 feet MSL at an indicated airspeed of more than 250 knots (288 m.p.h.).

(b) Unless otherwise authorized or required by ATC, no person may operate an aircraft at or below 2,500 feet above the surface within 4 nautical miles of the primary airport of a Class C or Class D airspace area at an indicated airspeed of more than 200 knots (230 mph.). This paragraph (b) does not apply to any operations within a Class B airspace area. Such operations shall comply with paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) No person may operate an aircraft in the airspace underlying a Class B airspace area designated for an airport or in a VFR corridor designated through such a Class B airspace area, at an indicated airspeed of more than 200 knots (230 mph).

(d) If the minimum safe airspeed for any particular operation is greater than the maximum speed prescribed in this section, the aircraft may be operated at that minimum speed.



Last edited by CRJCapt on Sat Feb 24, 2007 1:15 am, edited 1 time in total
Overbanked Guest

270 kts is a big difference from 250 knots.
I would consider 2 or 3 knots over 250 to be acceptable but I'm no expert. I often have to bump the nose up a bit during climbs to stay legal which isn't always easy.

The rule is to keep faster aircraft from closing in too rapidly on the slower aircraft who operate below 10,000 ft. They stay separated better that way. Also, it reduces the impact of possible bird strikes.

Pro Member Captain
ARD-DC Captain

"XXX Approach, Speedfreak001 request high-speed" Smile

If you're in luck and there is no other traffic in front of you, and you're not too low over a densely populated area, you'll get a "Speed is yours" back from ATC, and off you go Smile

Pro Member Chief Captain
CRJCapt Chief Captain

ARD-DC wrote:

"XXX Approach, Speedfreak001 request high-speed" Smile

If you're in luck and there is no other traffic in front of you, and you're not too low over a densely populated area, you'll get a "Speed is yours" back from ATC, and off you go Smile

Negative. That does not give the pilot permission of break Federal Aviation Regulation(FAR)91.117 Aircraft speed as stated above, it only allows the pilot to fly any speed within the regulations. At least in the US, don't know about Europe.

All times are GMT Page 1 of 1

Related Questions