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How do you land the big jets?

Pro Member Chief Captain
Manuel Agustin Clausse (Agus0404) Chief Captain

Hello! Here, is this post, you can make a list of steps or an explanation of how do you land the big jets.
The purpose I made this post is because there's some people (including me) that have some problems with landings. I always practice my landings and they are improving. I can land smoothly but sometimes there are problems.
I hope to see some replies. This could help people to know how to land their big jets.

Thank you

12 Responses

PH Guest

Based on the 757 "real world".
During a visual approach the MLG should cross the threshold at about 50 feet. Never attempt to land short....unless you are messing about and attempt a v short r/w at AUW! Always be prepared to go around. As the a/c crosses the threshold you will lose sight of the visual aiming point therefore a steady rate of descent (ROD) should be maintained but remember to also look further down the runway and take in peripheral cues where possible to help judge ROD. From a stabilised approach (steady power and speed) the flare should be commenced at about 20 feet...very helpful if you have GPWS callouts of the radalt. After the initial reduction in ROD there should be very little further increase in pitch attitude, back pressure simply adjusted to counteract the trim change as the throttles are closed and then sit back and enjoy the gentle landing as the wheels kiss the tarmac! In wet conditions it is advisable to land a little harder.
Do not attempt to prolong the flare with the throttles closeda as increasing the pitch will increase the chance of a few sparks (tailstrike) and a call to the CP's office for tea and biscuits.
If you bounce hold or re-establish the normal landing attitude and add a little thrust to control the ROD. No need to add thrust for a shallow bounce or skip. If you bounce high apply TOGA and go around remembering to get a verified positive rate of climb before raising the gear, also check that spoilers have retracted otherwise you will not climb in a hurry.
Nothing tricky once you have it you won't lose it. This is as suggested based on the 757 but remains true for most jet transport.
paul.hand1@virgin.net

Pro Member First Officer
Michael_H First Officer

Practice landing with the 'APR' (approach) on auto pilot.

then you can sit back and watch for a while with no need to panic or do too much other than control your approach speed, flap settings, landing gear deployment until you get a good feel for the glide slope, rate of descent, etc. You can let the AP take you down to one or two hundred feet from touchdown and then take over.
That's the way I found best when learning how to approach and land in the large jets.

look at this:

https://forum.flyawaysimulation.com/forum/topic/2518/instrument-only-landings/

Pro Member Chief Captain
Alex (Fire_Emblem_Master) Chief Captain

Lordy that list i made must be popular

Pro Member Chief Captain
Manuel Agustin Clausse (Agus0404) Chief Captain

It could be popular, yes.... I don't know.
I will take a look again to your list. The first time I read it I didn't understand it very much but now looks easier to read it.
Don't ask me how... 🙄

Pro Member First Officer
leadfoot First Officer

As a rule, you should try to land on the first third of the rnwy, if you've gone beyond that before touchdown it is best to go around. The best landings come from a stable approach. By the time I'm on short final I have a stable speed of 150-160 kts depending on which plane I'm flying, and a 650-700fpm descent rate. I watch the alt. and cut throttle and begin the flare at 50' above the rnwy. ONE NOTE, within a half mile of rnwy it is best to forego the ILS indicator and look to the VASI lights for glideslope guidance, as you get close to to the rnwy the ILS needle is so flighty that it is almost impossible to keep centered, trying to do so less than 1/2 mile out will almost always trash an already well stabilized app. Also at that point if you've flown the glideslope well and are holding a constant speed you are almost assured of a good landing. GOOD LUCK.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Manuel Agustin Clausse (Agus0404) Chief Captain

That was really good, leadfoot. I liked your replay.
Thank you

Pro Member First Officer
Elkinallen First Officer

I was in autoland mode at 200 feet when the GPWS warning warned of the flaps setting. So, in panic, I slammed the flaps down!!!! That fugger balloned up to about 60 degrees nose up and came down HARD!!!!! I had crash turned off, so it was pretty funny. The plane smashed down, smoked all the gear, bounced in the air a few more times!!!

Can you believe it. One of the passengers complained!!! He was a FAA ASI.. What is a Chapter 49 44709?

Pro Member Chief Captain
Alex (Fire_Emblem_Master) Chief Captain

Actually, I don't have any problems with a "flighty" ILS indicator...and I hand fly all my approaches.

If you are follwing with the ILS approach, you can turn on the autopilot, and hit the APPR button, and it will follow the ILS flawlessly, just make sure you have the setting on NAV not GPS on the NAV/GPS switch! 😳

Pro Member First Officer
Elkinallen First Officer

It is all about a stabilized approach. This means that the rate of decent, airspeed are the same.

Vref is the speed of an aircraft where there is a BA (Body angle) of 0-3 degrees nose up and a rate of decent of about 700 fpm.

If you are to high, reduce powe A LITTLE and work the pitch to maintain the airspeed. If you are too low, increase power and raise the nose enough to maintain the airspeed. It is a ballet of maintaining the airspeed by changinging power and pitch.

Pitch is airspeed and power is altitude!

Keep this power setting all the way down to 30- 10 ft above the runway. Simultaneously: idle the power and flare ONLY 2-4 degrees!

Airliners are not made to be greased on. They need to settle somewhat abruptly so to activate certain automatic landing systems.

Make sense?

PH Guest

Agree with the above just wanted to clarify Vref - reference speed for final approach, normally 1.3Vso. This speed is worked out using the relevant aircraft charts and change with weight, flap setting etc (WAT). Airspeed being key.

PH Guest

Correcting myself altitude/temperature changes do not affect Vref!

Pro Member First Officer
Elkinallen First Officer

Thanks friend. I was merely saying that if one did not want to,,, welll, just to be lazy, the explanation that I gave will place the aircraft right at or very close to Vref. I am not trying to say anything except that it is a way of understanding what the end result is.

I have all the charts for performance and I usee them.

I should have mentioned Vref. I just wanted to make it simple.

Grazi Friend! 🍻 Bow Down

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