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A few questions from a newbie for real life pilots.....

bartez Guest

I have recently just leart how to fly a 747 on a flight plan from A to B without crashing!

Its took me about a week to learn this and landing was the hardest thing to get right and I have completed 3 flights in a row now without crashing which I am pumped with!! Very Happy .

Basically, the Autopilot does 90% of the flying all I do is takeoff, then whack it on autopilot and then guide it home the last 500ft or so and during the flight I just make sure I am on the right heading and at the right altitude etc........the rest of the time I just look at the scenery! Cool

I was wondering if this is how it happens in the real world? or is FS very dumbed down for numbskulls like me?

Also every time I exceed 370 KIAS I get the overspeed warning coming on. The aircraft can clearly go much faster, is there a speed restriction at certain altitude or something?

Thanks for any help!

Guest

That is pretty standard procedure - takeoff, then engage autopilot. Except if a line check coming up in which case might hand fly a bit.
When is your overspeed warning coming on? On approach? Cruise?
When you are flying a 747 at 40,000+ ft you have to be aware of limiting Mach Number. Check the data files for max cruise Mach Number and set this as the parameter in you MCP.

Pro Member First Officer
JLangevin First Officer

Welcome to the forums! As I am not a rated 747 pilot, I can certainly fly one. Here are a couple of points I would like to touch on from your post...

First off, you must become familiar with a few different terms. I would suggest going to an aviation site, or looking up an Aviation Glossary and print it out...

Whether you are preparing to take off, take off, climb, cruise, decend, pre landing, etc... there is a check list, and this list in your Kneeboard. The reason we call it a knee board is because this information is usually clipped to our knee via clipboard during flight for easy acces... hense the term.

Become familiar with the V speeds. This will help you understand why there are speed restrictions. There is roughly no speed restriction above FL100 (10,000 ft) other than what your own aircraft can handle. The overspeed indicator is there for safety. This is the point where the airframe will begin to vibrate in reality and sustain damage if kept there too long... Even though the plane is flying, it is still creating drag, mostly on the wings.. In reality, too much speed could cause the wings to break apart from the fuselage.

When you are planning your flight, you need to decided whether this is going to be VFR (Visual Flight Rules) or IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) - anything above 18000 or FL180 must file an IFR flight plan.

When approaching the airfield, you typically will use ILS to get yourself lined up, or if the weather permits, can follow assigned Vectors from ATC Approach and visually perform the landing...

One thing to keep in mind when landing... there are 4 lights next to the runway... they will appear either white or red... these indicate the Glide Slope, or the proper rate at which the aircraft will decent to the runway... If all 4 lights are red, you are WAY below the glide slope, if three lights are red and one is white, you are slightly below the glide slope, if two lights are red, and two are white, then you are within the glide slope... if three are white, and 1 is red, then you are slightly above the glide slope, and if all four are white, then you are way above the glide slope...

Depending on what your current altitude, speed, and distance to the runway are, you can usually correct your slope and still make a safe touch down, however, once a 747 becomes below the slope, is difficult to recover the proper slope... If you are too high in a 747, consider a go around, as they are not as maneuverable as your typical 737 or 767 for that matter.

Lastly, when approaching the airfield, make sure you have properly calculated your landing speed based on your weight. The weight of your aircraft is always changing based on the altimeter (barameteric pressure), luggage, manifest, unburned fuel, etc... Typical landing speed on a 747 is 155 kts... I usually steady it around 158-162kts since Im always a little nervous of such a large aircraft...

I hope this has helped.



Last edited by JLangevin on Thu Mar 08, 2007 6:34 am, edited 1 time in total
bartez Guest

JLangevin wrote:

Welcome to the forums! As I am not a rated 747 pilot, I can certainly fly one. Here are a couple of points I would like to touch on from your post...

First off, you must become familiar with a few different terms. I would suggest going to an aviation site, or looking up an Aviation Glossary and print it out...

Whether you are preparing to take off, take off, climb, cruise, decend, pre landing, etc... there is a check list, and this list in your Kneeboard. The reason we call it a knee board is because this information is usually clipped to our knee via clipboard during flight for easy acces... hense the term.

Become familiar with the V speeds. This will help you understand why there are speed restrictions. There is roughly no speed restriction above FL100 (10,000 ft) other than what your own aircraft can handle. The overspeed indicator is there for safety. This is the point where the airframe will begin to vibrate in reality and sustain damage if kept there too long... Even though the plane is flying, it is still creating drag, mostly on the wings.. In reality, too much speed could cause the wings to break apart from the fuselage.

When you are planning your flight, you need to decided whether this is going to be VFR (Visual Flight Rules) or IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) - anything above 18000 or FL180 must file an IFR flight plan.

When approaching the airfield, you typically will use ILS to get yourself lined up, or if the weather permits, can follow assigned Vectors from ATC Approach and visually perform the landing...

One thing to keep in mind when landing... there are 4 lights next to the runway... they will appear either white or red... these indicate the Glide Slope, or the proper rate at which the aircraft will decent to the runway... If all 4 lights are red, you are WAY below the glide slope, if three lights are red and one is white, you are slightly below the glide slope, if two lights are red, and two are white, then you are within the glide slope... if three are white, and 1 is red, then you are slightly above the glide slope, and if all four are red, then you are way above the glide slope...

Depending on what your current altitude, speed, and distance to the runway are, you can usually correct your slope and still make a safe touch down, however, once a 747 becomes below the slope, is difficult to recover the proper slope... If you are too high in a 747, consider a go around, as they are not as maneuverable as your typical 737 or 767 for that matter.

Lastly, when approaching the airfield, make sure you have properly calculated your landing speed based on your weight. The weight of your aircraft is always changing based on the altimeter (barameteric pressure), luggage, manifest, unburned fuel, etc... Typical landing speed on a 747 is 155 kts... I usually steady it around 158-162kts since Im always a little nervous of such a large aircraft...

I hope this has helped.

Thanks for your help, yes there is so much I need to learn but I think I have the basics.

Thus far I am always running an IFR flight plan and an ILS approach and I seem to get by OK was for calculating landing speeds at the moment with my very limited knowledge I kind of just wing it (pardon the pun) when it comes to landing with speed etc I find 160knts usually does the job.

Thanks also for explaining the lights next to the runway I knew they were a guide but never new how to read them.

I feel I have done well an learnt alot within a week and I am currently flying over the Pyrenees from Paris to Madrid! and they are stunning! Cool

There is just so much to learn so I think I am going to go with a smaller aircraft maybe a 737 until I get my skills tight.
Cheers!

bartez Guest

Damn spelling mistakes! Mad as a guest I cant edit my posts!

Anyway, its late here in England so thats my excuse! Laughing

bartez Guest

Also another question, I was flying from Madrid to Lisbon on an IFR flight plan and when I got to about 40nm from the airport ATC said it was cancelling my IFR flight plan so I had to ask again for clearance to land and go through the ILS approach settings again.

I followed all instructions for heading and altitude so cant figure out what happened??

Any ideas?? Question

Pro Member Chief Captain
VegasFlyer Chief Captain

It could be that you missed to call in on one of the air traffic control changes. Confused

Are you sure you didn't press -Cancel IFR- by mistake?

Pro Member First Officer
JLangevin First Officer

Thats what I was thinking... When an aircraft stops responding in reality, they dont simply say "goodbye" - but will inquire as to why there is no response...

On Flight Simulator, if you miss a call from them, or frequiency change, they simply cancel your radar services and forget about you... There is no reason why ATC would cancel your Flight Following without you doing something incorrectly.

Pro Member Chief Captain
VegasFlyer Chief Captain

JLangevin wrote:

Thats what I was thinking... When an aircraft stops responding in reality, they dont simply say "goodbye" - but will inquire as to why there is no response...

On Flight Simulator, if you miss a call from them, or frequiency change, they simply cancel your radar services and forget about you... There is no reason why ATC would cancel your Flight Following without you doing something incorrectly.

Weel, once while I was doing a second approach into LOWW (Vienna ) ATC took me so far away from the airport, I belive around 50 nm, that they just said my IFR is cancelled.

That's one of the things I hate about FS9.

Cheers

bartez Guest

VegasFlyer wrote:

JLangevin wrote:

Thats what I was thinking... When an aircraft stops responding in reality, they dont simply say "goodbye" - but will inquire as to why there is no response...

On Flight Simulator, if you miss a call from them, or frequiency change, they simply cancel your radar services and forget about you... There is no reason why ATC would cancel your Flight Following without you doing something incorrectly.

Weel, once while I was doing a second approach into LOWW (Vienna ) ATC took me so far away from the airport, I belive around 50 nm, that they just said my IFR is cancelled.

That's one of the things I hate about FS9.

Cheers

thanks for your replies guys and this I believe is exactly what happened to me , ATC took me too far away from the airport and just said 'goodbye'!

Air-Head Guest

Almost quiet humorous, ATC guide you away from where you want to land, and say Bye Bye... IFR Cancelled. so long sucker Very Happy

I have to admit to have not noticed this happen, im usually been lucky and have been guided down, when doing an IFR. Albeit once there was a plane taking off on the runway I was cleared to land on. Mad

Is it certain airports some of the time? or certain airports all of the time, as in a software glitch?

Pro Member Chief Captain
VegasFlyer Chief Captain

Air-Head wrote:

Almost quiet humorous, ATC guide you away from where you want to land, and say Bye Bye... IFR Cancelled. so long sucker Very Happy

I have to admit to have not noticed this happen, im usually been lucky and have been guided down, when doing an IFR. Albeit once there was a plane taking off on the runway I was cleared to land on. Mad

Is it certain airports some of the time? or certain airports all of the time, as in a software glitch?

I guess that's the way FS9 is made. Basically, all large airports with quite a bite traffic issue wrong clearnces. We just have to live with it!

Overbanked Guest

I just bought FS 2004 last week.

"Also every time I exceed 370 KIAS I get the overspeed warning coming on. The aircraft can clearly go much faster, is there a speed restriction at certain altitude or something?"

370 KIAS sounds awfully fast if you ask me. I only use the 737 and have never taken it above 280 KIAS. Not on purpose, anyway! Your Indicated speed (KIAS) will fall with altitude because the air gets thinner and the instrument will think the plane is slowing down. But your actual Ground speed will stay the same. Your Mach speed will climb because sound travels slower in thin air. It might travel at 1100 fps at sea level, but only 700 fps at 32000 feet. It's very confusing.

Pro Member First Officer
Dan Young (dannyboy2005) First Officer

JLangevin - some good tips.

May i ask.

Lastly, when approaching the airfield, make sure you have properly calculated your landing speed based on your weight. The weight of your aircraft is always changing based on the altimeter (barameteric pressure), luggage, manifest, unburned fuel, etc... Typical landing speed on a 747 is 155 kts... I usually steady it around 158-162kts since Im always a little nervous of such a large aircraft...

How do i know the weight of my aircraft? How do i know the best speed to land my aircraft?

Pro Member Chief Captain
CRJCapt Chief Captain

dannyboy2005 wrote:

How do i know the weight of my aircraft? How do i know the best speed to land my aircraft?

Within FS on top menu, [Aircraft], [Fuel and payload] read Gross weight.
The landing speed, per weight, can be found on the aircraft clipboard information.

Pro Member Captain
ARD-DC Captain

And, (given the topic title, "for real pilots") real pilots would do this how, seen as there is no menu bar in the top of a 747 cockpit? Laughing

Add unburnt fuel to the zero fuel weight?

Pro Member Chief Captain
CRJCapt Chief Captain

Real aircraft(large jets) compute the weight and balance with the FMC/FMS. In flight, the landing weight is checked to determine V speeds. For non- FMC equipped aircraft, the weight and balance paperwork shows the estimated landing weight based on the current load minus the expected fuel burn.

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