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A few quick questions for you real-world pilots out there...

Pro Member Trainee
scudder Trainee

Ok, so I've been using FlightSim for several years now (started with FS2002 in 2003 or so), and now that I'm a member of this forum I have a few nagging questions relating to how things actually happen in the real world vs. the sim:

1) In the 747 at cruising altitude, I tend to stay at about 5 deg nose up pitch, even in straight and level flight. Is this realistic, or just my flying?

2) On trans-atlantic flights, is there a point where you lose radio contact? (due to the fact that there are no centers in the middle of the ocean!) I've noticed the sim simply stops handoffs after a certain point for IFR flights until you're closer to your destination continent, but you can always talk to the last center that handled you on your way out to sea. I assume this isn't realistic, how does it work in real life?

3) I'm sure this is a complex question, but is it typical for a jet (say the 747 or Learjet) to cruise at close to the Vmo specified in the ref tab, or do they realistically cruise at slower speeds?

Thanks for letting me pick your brains, hopefully this forum will make me smarter so I can return the favor someday. Very Happy

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

scudder wrote:

1) In the 747 at cruising altitude, I tend to stay at about 5 deg nose up pitch, even in straight and level flight. Is this realistic, or just my flying?

Entirely realistic. Commercial airliners are heavy chunks of metal flying at an altitude with little resistance to support the airframe so a few degrees pitch up attitude is necessary to maintain level flight.

scudder wrote:

2) On trans-atlantic flights, is there a point where you lose radio contact? (due to the fact that there are no centers in the middle of the ocean!) I've noticed the sim simply stops handoffs after a certain point for IFR flights until you're closer to your destination continent, but you can always talk to the last center that handled you on your way out to sea. I assume this isn't realistic, how does it work in real life?

In real life, aircraft over the Atlantic monitor a frequency rather than talk to anyone in particular. However, in real life, this is abused and is often used as general chit chat. Word has it the American Airlines pilots are especially bad with this with "ride reports" and the latest sports scores Rolling Eyes

scudder wrote:

3) I'm sure this is a complex question, but is it typical for a jet (say the 747 or Learjet) to cruise at close to the Vmo specified in the ref tab, or do they realistically cruise at slower speeds?

Airliners will generally cruise at a speed that is most economical but is also in keeping with time slots at the arrival airport. I find that I generally cruise (the FMC chooses this speed for me in the LEGS page) at .78-.80 Mach in the sim. VMO is around .85-.88. Real world airliners will only increase speed up to closer to VMO when they are behind schedule. VNE will be around .88-.93. This will be avoided by a long way.

Hope that helps a bit.

Pro Member Chief Captain
bawls327 Chief Captain

I find that the wind is a little bit too much. Maybe its just my joystick but when I am having crosswind to the right I turn right on the aileron and of course the rudder to help me stay lined up with the runway but whenever I do that I turn right to the right of the center line and its just way too much of a messy takeoff for me.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

bawls327 wrote:

I find that the wind is a little bit too much. Maybe its just my joystick but when I am having crosswind to the right I turn right on the aileron and of course the rudder to help me stay lined up with the runway but whenever I do that I turn right to the right of the center line and its just way too much of a messy takeoff for me.

Question Question Question

Unless I just missed something, that's not relevant to this thread...

Pro Member Trainee
Air-Head Trainee

99jolegg wrote:

bawls327 wrote:

I find that the wind is a little bit too much. Maybe its just my joystick but when I am having crosswind to the right I turn right on the aileron and of course the rudder to help me stay lined up with the runway but whenever I do that I turn right to the right of the center line and its just way too much of a messy takeoff for me.

Question Question Question

Unless I just missed something, that's not relevant to this thread...

Very Happy what I was thinking when I read it! but didnt want to say anything...

Although in terms of realism it probably is realistic-ish if a crosswind situation was present during take-off.

If he doesnt like that, he can change the weather settings either locally or as a global, and fix that issue.

Pro Member Chief Captain
bawls327 Chief Captain

Well he was asking questions on real life vs sim. I gave my statement that the only problem that I had vs what I didnt like against the sim vs real life was what I was posted. And yes I know about the wind and that wont change anything. Was talking about how it was unrealistic that if I turn right while taxing or doing it during take off then the plane turns to the right.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Ah ok. Still, not sure I understand what you mean.

If you have crosswind "to the right", do you mean the wind is going right, across the runway, or that you are being pushed towards the right side of the runway?

It sounds like you're overcompensating on the rudder. You only need a fraction to keep the centerline. If you have autorudder turned on too, it'll get quite messy.

Pro Member Chief Captain
bawls327 Chief Captain

This is what I mean in real life when I am taking off what do you do when you have crosswind to the right, you turn to the right using your yoke then of course ease up on it once you are going to be airborne. I am not sure if its just my joystick which I can control the rudder using it but its like its to sensitive also whenever I turn to the right the plane goes to the right when I am taxing and or taking off. This happens with any wind whether its tailwind etc. All this what I am saying I put in that the there is wind coming from the right.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

bawls327 wrote:

This is what I mean in real life when I am taking off what do you do when you have crosswind to the right, you turn to the right using your yoke then of course ease up on it once you are going to be airborne. I am not sure if its just my joystick which I can control the rudder using it but its like its to sensitive also whenever I turn to the right the plane goes to the right when I am taxing and or taking off. This happens with any wind whether its tailwind etc. All this what I am saying I put in that the there is wind coming from the right.

Sorry, I can't really make head nor tail of what you're saying. Crosswind is a vector given as direction and speed. Crosswind at 090 means the wind is coming from 090. Crosswind "to the right" is very unclear. Is the wind coming from the right or going to the right. Give us your runway and the wind reading (e.g. 120/12) and it'll make more sense.

bawls327 wrote:

All this what I am saying I put in that the there is wind coming from the right

Do what now?

Rolling Eyes

Pro Member First Officer
xXx-DeathKid-xXx First Officer

Tell ya what though, you need Unicom chit-chat, otherwise TA flights would be soooo boring! Laughing

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