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Nose up pitch attitude

Pro Member First Officer
Bartholomew First Officer

You can pretty much never cruise in a jet in less than maybe 1 or 2 (or 4 in a 747) degrees nose up pitch.
So let's take a 747 for example: can the passangers feel the nose up attitude when they walk the airplane (if not when they sit).

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

No, I don't think you could. 2-4 degrees is such a minimal amount it is difficult to see. When you are at level flight you cannot tell the aircraft is pitched up slightly.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Manuel Agustin Clausse (Agus0404) Chief Captain

I've been many times on a real plane and I never feel the aircraft with a few degrees nose up.

Pro Member First Officer
Greg (FL050) First Officer

Agus0404 wrote:

I've been many times on a real plane and I never feel the aircraft with a few degrees nose up.

Exactly.

Pro Member Trainee
FHeselton Trainee

I agree, I have never noticed the nose up ptich on any of the flights I've taken over the years.

Pro Member First Officer
Martin (Blake14) First Officer

Exc ept for landing and take off, I don't think I ever feel any thing. I have never felt turns and pitch attitude.

Pro Member Chief Captain
tomthetank Chief Captain

😀 Next time you are flying and at cruise alt,watch the cabincrew with the trolley(its more noticable from the rear of the plane)

Your brain plays funny tricks on you.Because most of what you see on board is not on the move, ie seats,floor,windows etc,your brain thinks its not moving,or turning
Most pax jets fly with a slight nose up because its the most fuel efficient angle that the plane can fly cleanly,ie no control surfaces distrupting airflow

Its something to do with the way the wing is designed,if you flew dead level,you would have to trim the aircraft in such a way that it would loose its "clean" line

Pro Member Captain
Jared Captain

This one time when i was on a Midwest airlines MD-80 MCO-MKE. and during cruise you could tell by looking foward that it was pitched up. but not a lot.

Pro Member Trainee
bradw1 Trainee

The reason an aircraft must pitch up during cruise is because it is impossible to maintain altitude with a angle of attack of 0.

Pro Member Trainee
jaapverduijn Trainee

bradw1 wrote:

The reason an aircraft must pitch up during cruise is because it is impossible to maintain altitude with a angle of attack of 0.

Greetings Brad!

That's so much different and barely related nonsense jammed into one single sentence that I wouldn't even know where to begin to unravel this quite astonishing aerodynamic gordian knot (grin)!

The majority of people alive today (including, although by the skin of my teeth, myself) are too young to have ever seen the Armstrong Whitworth Whitley fly. Yet it's still the best example of an aircraft that cruised pitch DOWN, which had far less to do with angle of attack than with angle of incidence... just like the reason why other aircraft cruise pitch UP has far less to do with angle of attack than with angle of incidence. Not to mention Bernoulli, of course, although the influence of Bernoulli's principle is considered to be somewhat overrated in modern studies of aerodynamics.

I'm curious: what exactly do you base your astonishing statement on?

Be well!

Jaap Verduijn.

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