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Virus, Trojans, Spam and now PHONEY Anti-Spyware Programs

Rick Lee Guest

Hi everyone,

just when you thought it was safe...

To understand adware, you first need to know how PCs get it. The ways that Howes obtained the adware he used in his tests provide us with some perfect examples:

Software downloads

For one group of tests, Howes downloaded and installed Grokster, a popular peer-to-peer file-sharing program, from CNET Download.com. Installing Grokster and clicking OK in its subsequent dialog boxes loaded 15 separate adware programs, containing 134 "critical" executable components, by Howes's count. This source of infection would compromise even Windows XP with its new Service Pack 2 (SP2).

Drive-by downloads

To set up another group of tests, Howes used Internet Explorer to visit the following Web locations: 007 Arcade Games (a games site), LyricsDomain (a song lyrics site) , and Innovators of Wrestling (yep, a wrestling site) . This resulted in 23 different adware programs being installed, carrying 138 components, Howes says. Drive-by downloads such as these are now less of a problem for users who've installed XP SP2.

You can't step into the same river twice

For yet another test, Howes visited the wrestling site again, but on a different date. The makers of adware must have signed a lot of distribution contracts with the site in the interim. Howes says his PC picked up 25 adware programs and 153 components on that one visit alone. (You'll notice that I didn't link to the examples I cited above, and I strongly recommend that you avoid trying any of them.)

I ripped the excerpt above from here ➡

http://www.pcreview.co.uk/articles/Windows/Protection_against_Adware_and_Spyware/

If you're even slightly concerned, I'd suggest to take the time and read the whole article. It also contains a link called: list of rogue/suspect anti-spyware. ➡

http://www.spywarewarrior.com/rogue_anti-spyware.htm

This is a very long page but a little farther down you'll find in alphabetical order a list of phoneys with a description. See if you can spot the anti-spyware you're running on your machine.

Yes, and this time I do hope that your search will yield a negative result ❗

Safe browsing to you all, Rick 🙂

Guest

Rick Lee wrote:

Hi everyone,

just when you thought it was safe...

To understand adware, you first need to know how PCs get it. The ways that Howes obtained the adware he used in his tests provide us with some perfect examples:

Software downloads

For one group of tests, Howes downloaded and installed Grokster, a popular peer-to-peer file-sharing program, from CNET Download.com. Installing Grokster and clicking OK in its subsequent dialog boxes loaded 15 separate adware programs, containing 134 "critical" executable components, by Howes's count. This source of infection would compromise even Windows XP with its new Service Pack 2 (SP2).

Drive-by downloads

To set up another group of tests, Howes used Internet Explorer to visit the following Web locations: 007 Arcade Games (a games site), LyricsDomain (a song lyrics site) , and Innovators of Wrestling (yep, a wrestling site) . This resulted in 23 different adware programs being installed, carrying 138 components, Howes says. Drive-by downloads such as these are now less of a problem for users who've installed XP SP2.

You can't step into the same river twice

For yet another test, Howes visited the wrestling site again, but on a different date. The makers of adware must have signed a lot of distribution contracts with the site in the interim. Howes says his PC picked up 25 adware programs and 153 components on that one visit alone. (You'll notice that I didn't link to the examples I cited above, and I strongly recommend that you avoid trying any of them.)

I ripped the excerpt above from here ➡

http://www.pcreview.co.uk/articles/Windows/Protection_against_Adware_and_Spyware/

If you're even slightly concerned, I'd suggest to take the time and read the whole article. It also contains a link called: list of rogue/suspect anti-spyware. ➡

http://www.spywarewarrior.com/rogue_anti-spyware.htm

This is a very long page but a little farther down you'll find in alphabetical order a list of phoneys with a description. See if you can spot the anti-spyware you're running on your machine.

Yes, and this time I do hope that your search will yield a negative result ❗

Safe browsing to you all, Rick 🙂

Pro Member Captain
Jon Van Duyn (JVD) Captain

If you ever get a Trojan virus just go to C:\Documents and Settings\user\Local Settings\Temp\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5 and then open all the folders in that link and delete the virus by searching for it's name but if you don't find it delete every thing [cookies] in those folders but what ever you do don't delete the folders in " CONTENT.IE5" No, No! Nope .

I'll be up all night as I have bronchitis Ill but if you want to ask directions on how to delete a virus just ask and you will almost get an immediate answer.

Guest

JVD wrote:

If you ever get a Trojan virus just go to C:\Documents and Settings\user\Local Settings\Temp\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5 and then open all the folders in that link and delete the virus by searching for it's name but if you don't find it delete every thing [cookies] in those folders but what ever you do don't delete the folders in " CONTENT.IE5" No, No! Nope .

I'll be up all night as I have bronchitis Ill but if you want to ask directions on how to delete a virus just ask and you will almost get an immediate answer.

does your remedy include people who do not use Internet Explorer?

thanks

Pro Member Captain
Jon Van Duyn (JVD) Captain

It normaly works if somone has cookies [certain types of files] in their Temporary internet files.Those cookies sometimes have viruses attached to them.

I have had 9 serious viruses this year and most of them were located in the temporary internet file directory.

If Norton tells you that you have a virus you must write down the location [Norton normaly doesn't fix the prob fully but it tells you where the prob is] of the virus and then go to that location and delete it. Well I'm not trained to fix viruses but I have fixed them for many people [over phone, internet etc...] but if you don't feel right about doing it yourself it's best your call in somone that is qualified.

If you don't use internet explorer what do you use [it would help to answer your question a bit better] ❓

Guest

thanks,

i asked because your path C:\Documents and Settings\user\Local Settings\Temp\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5 points at Internet Explorer.

i use Firefox.

you wrote:

If Norton tells you that you have a virus you must write down the location [Norton normaly doesn't fix the prob fully but it tells you where the prob is] of the virus and then go to that location and delete it.

i don't use Symantec products. what now?

thanks

Pro Member Captain
Jon Van Duyn (JVD) Captain

i don't use Symantec products. what now?

You don' have to use Symantec products. You just need a program to warn you and tell you of the location of the virus.

Guest

thanks,

JVD wrote:

i don't use Symantec products. what now?

You don' have to use Symantec products. You just need a program to warn you and tell you of the location of the virus.

you mean an antivirus program? i have a very good one. but i have no virus.
what now?

thanks

Pro Member Captain
Jon Van Duyn (JVD) Captain

well then you don't have to worry but if you want to reduce the risk of getting a virus, I'd sujest deleting all your cookies atleast twice a month.The only problem with deleting your cookies is that every time you delete them you will have to sign in to certain websites again [if a memebership is required].

tartan Guest

you guys groping in the dark?? read this ➡

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spyware#Spyware_and_viruses

Guest

Apart from the last post - I have never read so much misinformation and misconception and confusion between spyware, viruses, adware, etc - and the guy who advises to delete all your cookies - is that the same guy that lost a program by deleting the program folders rather than uninstalling??? His highly informative description of cookies as "certain types of files" is a beaut!!!
Take the tip and go to the link suggested by Tartan and of course install a good antivirus software which has a good update service and run every program/file/document/etc through it immediately after download

tartan Guest

Anonymous wrote:

Apart from the last post - I have never read so much misinformation and misconception and confusion between spyware, viruses, adware, etc - and the guy who advises to delete all your cookies - is that the same guy that lost a program by deleting the program folders rather than uninstalling??? His highly informative description of cookies as "certain types of files" is a beaut!!!
Take the tip and go to the link suggested by Tartan and of course install a good antivirus software which has a good update service and run every program/file/document/etc through it immediately after download

agreed, Guest. The right information is available. The misconception and confusion is caused by lack of patience. Reading an article and trying to understand what has been read requires just that.

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