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Nile River Tour

Guest Ed Guest

Hey all,

Having just finished the Mississippi River tour, I decided to pop over to Africa and fly the length of the Nile River, from its source at Lake Victoria to the mouth in the Mediterranean Sea.

The Mississippi tour left me at South Lafourche, Louisiana (L49), a small strip near the Gulf of Mexico. FS09 shows South Lafourche as having an elevation of one foot, so I don't wanna be there when the glaciers melt!! There is an oil drilling platform in the Gulf, due south of L49, the only one I've ever seen in FS09.

After flying low and slow for a month, I was in the mood to get up high and go fast, so I picked up a Lear Jet to fly to Africa. Getting the Lear OUT of South Lafourche was a bit hairy, because the strip is only 3400', and the recommended minimum for the Lear is 4000'. So it was a full flaps, rev it up to 100% before releasing the brake, get that gear up right away and try to miss the trees kind of take-off. Shocked

Since the origin of the Nile is near the equator, I didn't want to go all the way around the Atlantic to the north, so instead I decided to cross near the equator. I flew south to Belem, Brazil (SBBE), with a stop to refuel at Piarco International Airport, Port of Spain, Trinidad & Tobago (TTPP). From Belem, it is just over 2000 nm over to Ascension Island, in the middle of the Atlantic. I used this route on my Around the World trip a few months ago, so I knew the Lear had enough range to do it, although I did spot another island with an airport off the coast of Brazil, Narohna was the name I believe, which might be useful to someone attempting the crossing in an aircraft with less range. I spent the first sim night on Ascension, before heading out the next morning at dawn.

It is just about 1600 nm over to Libreville (FOOL) on the coast of Africa, and I stopped there for lunch and a refuel.

The source of the Nile is usually described as being Lake Victoria, near the city of Jinja, Uganda, on the north shore of the lake. There is an airport at Jinja, HUJI, but it is a fairly short, dirt runway. Rather than attempt that in the Lear, I landed at nearby Entebbe International (HUEN), about 1000 nm miles from Libreville. It was getting late in the afternoon, 4:15 PM local time, so I've decided to spend the second sim night of the trip at Entebbe, and get an early start tomorrow on the Nile Tour.

I will probably go to a prop plane for the actual tour, but I haven't decided which one yet. Since the Nile is over 4000 statute miles long, I want something reasonably fast, but able to set down on a short strip or even a desert road-- I'll see what's available tomorrow morning.

Ed

Pro Member Chief Captain
Matthew Shope (mypilot) Chief Captain

Another famous tour! Laughing

Good luck and good flying. Wink

Pro Member Captain
nottobe Captain

guest Ed, I bought Cessna 441 Conquest II from Flight1 Software. And I love flying it every minute. Its a turbo twin prop, with pressurized cabin it can get you as high as FL 360, as fast as 300 knots, yet capable of maneuvers as low as you want, as slow as 80 knots. its a very versatile plane, but the fuel cost is a little high.....you get free fuel in the sim anyway, dont worry about the fuel..... Smile

Guest Ed Guest

nottobe wrote:

its a very versatile plane, but the fuel cost is a little high.....you get free fuel in the sim anyway, dont worry about the fuel..... Smile

Yeah, I hate to think what the fuel for some of my tours would cost. The Lear holds just over 6000 pounds of fuel, that's about 1000 gallons-- I don't know what jet fuel goes for, but if it's similar to gasoline in California, that would be over $2500 (1388 GBP) each time I land and "Fill 'er up." And that's if I go to the "Self Serve" pump!! Wink

Fortunately, I can just put it on my sim Unobtainium VISA. Laughing

Ed

Guest

Try buying PMDG's Beech1900C for your tour.

Guest Ed Guest

I must confess, I've never been at all tempted to buy or download add-on planes. I'm a very casual flyer, not at all as serious as many of those here. FS09 is my first flight sim, and I've only had it about 18 months-- I haven't even flown all the default aircraft yet. So I have a few favorites that I keep coming back to (the Lear, the King Air, the Cessna Amphibian), and sometimes I'll branch out and try something new from the defaults, but that's about it.

Personally, I think that's one of the really great things about FS09-- you can go at it just about any way you want. It is totally open-ended. If you want to fly scheduled routes for an airline, you can do that. If you want to fly aerobatics, you can do that. If you've always wanted to fly a helicopter under the Tower Bridge over the Thames, you can do that. It can be like an arcade game, or it can be an intense training aid for real pilots, or anything in between.

But I just enjoy flying around the world, learning a little about the world as I go. And I enjoy coming here to share it with all of you.

Ed

Pro Member First Officer
Paiute First Officer

Your descriptions of your river tours got me interesting in doing one also. I chose to do the Missouri River, from it's confluence with the Mississippi River to the mountains. The Lewis and Clark expedition followed the Missouri River all the way to the mountains, so I will try to learn some new stuff on their journey. They started at St. Charles, MO, which is about 20 miles from the Mississippi, so I will start at Alton, IL, opposite the mouth of the Missouri. That way I can "do" the whole river.

I will use a high wing Cessna so I can see everything without a wing blocking part of the view. Maybe a Cessna Cardinal RG, not too fast, but faster than a Skyhawk. I will look forward to seeing the "Missouri Breaks" in Montana. That's a stretch of rapids that Lewis and Clark had to portage around. "Missouri Breaks" has an exotic "ring' to it. Cool

Guest Ed Guest

Paiute, I hopeyou're not disappointed when you get to the rapids, because I've never seen any rapids depicted in FS09 in any of my tours. The only other comment I would offer about your tour is that it's much easier to start at the headwaters of a river and fly downstream than it is to go upstream-- since the rivers are not labeled on the map or in the GPS, it can be difficult to tell which way to fly when you come to a fork in the river. You really need a "real" map to refer to, if you do it that way.

But have fun, that sounds like a fun tour. I sort of thought about doing the Missouri when I past it heading down the Mississippi, but it will have to way for another time, because I've got this Nile River to fly now. Laughing

Ed

Guest Ed Guest

The Nile River tour started officially, yesterday. Up to now, I've been flying TO the Nile, but I finally got my act together and started down river.

I had been trying to decide which aircraft to use; I like the props for a low'n'slow tour like this, but I've spent a lot of time in the Cessna Amphibian lately and wanted something different. I toyed with the idea of doing a river tour by helicopter, like the Bell 206B JetRanger, thinking it would be cool to set down next to the Pyramids at Giza for sightseeing, and such. But I crashed twice just trying to get off ground-- never haven't gotten the hang of those crazy things. Besides, I wanted something with autopilot, pretty much a necessity for these long tours.

So after seeing what was available at Entebbe, I settled on the Mooney Bravo. It's fast for a prop (cruises comfortably at 170 kias, at low altitude) and it has those nice big windows all around for sightseeing-- you can easily see in every direction. The only drawbacks I found with the Mooney are that the fuel selector switch has Left, Right, and Off, but not "Both." So every 15 minutes or so I have to switch tanks, or the plane will start rolling away from the selected tank as it becomes lighter, which makes it hard to fly straight. And there is no ADF indicator. Since there aren't many ILS airports or even VORs in Central Africa, that NDB would come in handy some times. Not a big deal, with GPS.

The route I chose for the tour was to follow the White Nile from Lake Victoria, downstream to the junction with the Blue Nile at Khartoum, and continue north to the Nile Delta and out into the Mediterranean. There is some controversy about what is the "real" source of the Nile; some say it is another river that enters Lake Victoria, and thus is the source of the Nile. Others say that the real source of the Nile is the headwaters of the Blue Nile at Lake Tana, in Ethiopia, because the Blue Nile actually supplies the greatest quantity of water to the Nile Valley, about 83%. But the Blue Nile doesn't even flow all year, it only contributes water when there are heavy rains in Ethiopia.

So, the beginning of the White Nile at Lake Victoria is point where the river bearing the name "Nile," which flows all year round, actually begins, so that was the start of my trip.

As I said in my earlier post, I got to Entebbe International in Uganda late in the afternoon, and thought I would spend the night. But after reports of a mysteriously damaged helicopter there, and with me being seen checking out other aircraft, the local authorities were showing a lot of interest in my activities, my passport, and especially any cash I might have on hand. So at the earliest opportunity, I slipped out the back door of the hanger, "liberated" the Mooney (hey, I left them a Lear Jet for collateral) and headed for Jinja, and the source of the Nile. I took off without clearance, flew low to avoid the radar, and didn't talk to anyone on the radio until I had left Ugandan airspace.

Not far down river is the airport at Mahagi (FZKC), on Lake Alberta in the Peoples Republic of the Congo. It's just dirt strip with no lights and no ATC, so I thought I'd set down there, get some shut-eye and head north along the river at dawn. Only problem is, I had forgotten how quickly the sun goes down in equatorial regions. It's less than an hour flight to Mahagi, but by the time I got there, it was totally dark. I couldn't find that airport to save my life.

Fortunately, the previous owners of the aircraft had left some charts in it, so I found an airport with a VOR and lights about a hundred miles north, right on the Nile, at Juba, Sudan (HSSJ). I got in there well after dark, slept in the plane, and generally tried to avoid drawing attention to myself.

At dawn, I again headed north along the river. I was surprised to learn that because of a dam above Juba, the mighty Nile is not much more than a trickle through much of Sudan (at least in FS09-- as I said before, the White Nile is supposed to flow all year). I followed the river's course as long as I could, but when it disappeared, I just set a direct GPS course to the next airport I could see that was actually on the main course of the river, at Malakal, Sudan (HSSM). I got in there at about 8:00 AM, had a hearty breakfast at the airport, fueled up, and head east and north to Khartoum, still in Sudan.

Khartoum is a surprising large city, and the international airport (HSSS)has two ILS approaches, the first I'd seen since leaving Entebbe. The airport is near the junction of the Blue Nile with the White Nile, so from here on it is simply the "Nile River."

But I'll have to save that part of the trip for another day; I need to spend a little time in Khartoum. I've found a guy at the airport who's willing to change the aircraft identification markings in exchange for a share of some cash that I found under the floor panel (lots of it, in a briefcase, all with non-sequential serial numbers). Wink

Ed

Pro Member First Officer
Paiute First Officer

Guest Ed,

Be careful how you spend your time in Khartoum. In 1884 British General Charles Gordon, Governor of the Sudan, was beheaded by
forces led by the Mahdi. Queen Victoria sent a British army under Lord
Kitchener to save him, but Kitchener arrived too late. Kitchener was opposed to saving him, so he took his time getting up the Nile to Khartoum. Crying or Very sad

Guest Ed Guest

Thanks for the warning! Shocked

So did Victoria have Kitchener beheaded for his impudence?

Ed

Rick Lee Guest

Guest Ed wrote:

Thanks for the warning! Shocked

So did Victoria have Kitchener beheaded for his impudence?

Ed

Ed, her Majesty did not have him beheaded. In fact he outlived her by some 15 years. Browsing through his biography reminds me of reading about Genghis Khan.

Here's a link Arrow http://freemasonry.bcy.ca/biography/kitchener_h/kitchener_h.html

The page pertaining to this link does not mention Lord Kitchener's stint in South Africa during the Boer War, where he, according to some historians set up the first concentration camps. James A. Michener, the great american storyteller has written a good yarn about that period in his "The Covenant".

During WWI Kitchener senselessly sacrificed troops in Turkey.

That Kitchener was a Mason is news to me, interesting news. That's why I'm going to do some Googleing right now.

Regards, Rick

Guest Ed Guest

Well, I managed to escape Khartoum with my head still attached, and my new best friend, Amit, did a wonderful job of repainting the Mooney for me-- the original "owners" would hardly know it, which was my goal, considering the amount of money they so carelessly left under the floor panel. Unfortunately, there were strings attached to Amit's friendship-- besides the considerable amount of cash required to retain his services, he required something else of me.

In order to complete the deal, Amit required one thing of me-- that was to fly his sister, Nazan, to Cairo. Nazan, he said, was "the Sudanese Britney Spears," and had to go to "the big city," in order to make it as the pop star of the Arab world. Unfortunately, Nazan didn't have the proper endorsement on her passport to travel between Sudan and Egypt. I wasn't even sure she was really his sister (he was considerably older), but who am I to stand in the way of The Sudanese Britney Spears?

So, early the next morning, Nazan and I took off and flew north, following the course of the Nile. It was fun-- she brought a cassette player, and played some of her recordings for me-- she wasn't bad, although I couldn't understand a word she was singing, rock'n'roll is the same everywhere you go, and I recognized that. I had a few Lynyrd Skynyrd and Tom Petty tapes in my bag, and she was singing along-- she sounded alright-- "Sweet Home Alabama" sounds good in any language.

So we made our way north, headin' for Cairo.

Ed

Guest Ed Guest

Since I had no charts for this far north, I was pretty much obliged to follow the river. That was okay, because I had GPS and had intended to follow the river anyhow. I let Nazan ride in the co-pilot's seat, and she was like a kid at Disneyland.

We stopped at Merowe (HSMR) and Dongola (HSDN), still in Sudan, to stretch our legs-- actually, I noticed that after a while, Nazan would start looking tense, crossing and recrossing her legs, and I recognized that "gotta go" look in her eyes, so we stopped for a comfort break, and she dashed off to the ladies' room. Gotta keep the customers happy, I always say.

At about 1:00 that afternoon, we finally crossed the border into Egypt. I had no idea Sudan was such a large country-- on the map, it's easily twice as large as Egypt, at least in the north-south direction. By now, we were following Lake Nasser, and we passed the VOR at Abu Simbel. In my youth, I read about the contruction of the Aswan High Dam, how it flooded the valley of the Nile, requiring the relocation of the ancient Egyptian monuments at Abu Simbel. It was a big feature in Life magazine at the time, back when a big photo feature in Life was a Big Deal. There's nothing to be seen there now, in the sim-world. Nassan told me that her grandparents had been displaced from their farm in northern Sudan by the flooding.

As we reached the north end of Lake Nasser, Nassan asked me to land at Aswan, saying she was hungry, so just before 2:00 PM, we landed at Aswan International Airport (HESN) and had lunch. She excused herself after eating (leaving me with the bill for lunch), and just disappeared.

I waited in the coffee shop for almost an hour, but when she didn't return, I went looking for her. I was really afraid she had been picked up by the Egyptian immigration authorities, since she wasn't entirely legal to be in Egypt, and she was the kind of girl who might attract the attention of a bored security guard or police officer. Of course, I couldn't draw too much attention to myself, either, so I couldn't exactly walk into the Customs and Immigration Office and ask after her.

But I had given my word to Amit that I would deliver her to Cairo, so I at least had to try to find her.

After two hours, I was becoming frantic.

Ed

Guest Ed Guest

After scouting around the airport, and no success in finding the elusive Nazan, I made my way back to the Mooney. I intended to use the radio to speak to Amit in Khartoum, to see if possibly his "sister" had contacted him.

I did manage to talk to a pilot at Khartoum, but I was not able to explain to him a: who was Amit, and b: why he should bother to find Amit for me. I couldn't exactly explain to him that I was a fugitive wanted in Angola, transporting an Sudanese citizen illegally in Egypt assisted by my cohort there in Khartoum.

So I thanked the pilot in Khartoum for his time and wished him a good flight, then ran through the preflight checklist, and started the Mooney's engine. I planned to taxi over to the international terminal, where I figured the Customs and Immigration offices would be located.

Suddenly, the starboard door was suddenly yanked open and Nazan scrambled in, followed by three scruffy-looking young men carrying guitars and drums-- musical instruments whizzed behind my head as they were tossed into the passenger area. All the while, Nazan was screaming "Go, Go, Go! Fly NOW!!"

The reason for Nazan's haste was immediately obvious, as I looked out to the right and saw a military jeep and a truck about half a mile away, and coming right at us.

Not waiting for an explanation, I opened the throttle, dropped the flaps and swung out in to the GA parking area, pointing the nose of the aircraft directly at the approaching jeep. I silently prayed that the soldiers wouldn't open fire on a plane full of civilians-- and my prayer was answered. As soon as the passengers in the jeep saw us coming at them, they started pounding on the driver's head and shoulders and pointing to the left and right-- I could imagine them yelling "Turn! Turn!"

Fortunately, the driver valued is own life more than the mission he had been sent on, because he swerved to the right. Gathering speed, my eyes shifted rapidly back and forth between the airspeed indicator and the army truck, which was still coming at us.

Finally, we reached 85 KIAS and I pulled back on the yoke. Straining with a full load of fuel and a full load of passengers, the Mooney finally left the ground, and I immediately flicked the lever to raise the landing gear. Fortunately, the truck driver came to his senses about what he was doing and slammed on the brakes, and we cleared the roof of the truck by no more than three or four feet. The last thing I saw was the passenger in the truck with his arms thrown up in front of his face.

I don't know if any has ever attempted a short-field takeoff from the GA parking area at Aswan International before, but I bet those soldiers will be talking about the crazy Yankee who left town in hurry for a while.

At about 100 feet above the ground, I pushed forward on the yoke and cleaned up the plane, thinking that if the army had helicopters I would need as much speed as the Mooney could provide. At 175 KIAS, we flew low and followed the terrain until we were well clear of Aswan airspace.

Ed

Pro Member Chief Captain
RadarMan Chief Captain

Thumbs Up! Ed, Your adventures on the other side of the world are more exciting than Indiana Jones.
Thanks for all the trips and stories.
You have a vivid imagination and the talent to put it on paper. Clapping

Radar

Guest Ed Guest

Once she finally calmed down enough to speak, Nazan explained what had happened at Aswan. She had been planning to meet up with her band in Cairo-- they were travelling in an ancient van, hauling all the equipment. But the same day I arrived at Khartoum, she had gotten word from them that the van had broken down near Aswan and couldn't be fixed without the expenditure of a great deal of money, of which, being typical musicians, they had none.

So Nazan had convinced Amit, whom she confessed was really the band's manager and not her brother at all, to arrange a flight to Aswan and then on to Cairo. Of course, that's where I came in: wanting to travel fast and avoid calling attention to myself, I was the perfect candidate for the job of smuggling the Sudanese Britney Spears into Egypt.

The problems began when Nazan couldn't connect with her friends at Aswan Airport-- they couldn't get into the GA terminal due to airport security-- and Nazan couldn't go out, for fear that she wouldn't be able to come back in either.

What happened was that Nazan waited until there was only one security guard at the door, a young man, and she turned on the female charm to distract him. Maneuvering him until the guard's back was to the door, the band filed quietly into the terminal.

Everything was going smoothly until the guard got carried away with his flirting and tried to steal a kiss from the charming young Nazan-- at which time the guitar player, who really WAS Nazan's brother, felt he had to protect the young lady's virtue and laid the guard out with a guitar to the back of the head.

The guard didn't get up right away, but everybody else the terminal was running and yelling, so Nazan and the band hot-footed it out the door onto the tarmac, and towards the Mooney-- and you know the rest about the short-field takeoff from GA parking.

Eventually everybody's nerves calmed down, and the band sorted themselves out and had an impromptu rehearsal, right there in the back of the Mooney.

We touched down briefly at Asyut Airport (HELX) to refuel, and continued north towards Cairo. It was near dusk when we passed over the Pyramids at Giza and the Sphynx, on our final approach to runway 5R at Cairo International (HECA).

I half-expected to be met by a military escort as we taxied to GA parking, but nothing seemed to be amiss. Planes came and went, and an airport security vehicle passed through the parking area once while we were unloading all the musical instruments, but it didn't stop.

Thinking that the danger really was behind us, we all took a taxi into Cairo. On the way, I learned that the versatile Mr. Amit had, in fact, arranged a gig for the band in Cairo, for that very night. We arrived at the club in an affluent part of town at about 9 PM, and by 10 they were on stage beginning their first set.

And they really rocked! By the time they started the second number, the dance floor was filling up, and people were having a great time, especially the irrepressible Nazan, who was singing her heart out. I was beginning to think that all the risk had been worthwhile, because I had delivered The Sudanese Britney Spears and her band to Cairo, and they really were going to make it big.

I was feeling pretty good about life, until a waiter laid a piece of paper on my table-- thinking it was the bill, I turned it over and my heart sank. It was a note which said simply, "Call me. There is trouble. A."

If the only person on the African continent who knew me, knew where I had come from, and knew why I didn't want to be found thought there was trouble, I knew that I had to move on.

I caught Nazan's eye, and blew her a kiss to let her know I was leaving, and quickly left the club. As I left the door, I heard the band break into their version of Sweet Home Alabama, so I knew Nazan understood that I wouldn't be back.

Flagging a cab, I slipped the driver the largest denomination bill I had in my pocket and asked, "Can you get me to the airport right away, and then forget you ever saw me?"

"Of course," was all he said as he pocketed the bill.

Ed

Guest Ed Guest

RadarMan wrote:

Thumbs Up! Ed, Your adventures on the other side of the world are more exciting than Indiana Jones.
Thanks for all the trips and stories.
You have a vivid imagination and the talent to put it on paper. Clapping

Radar

Thanks, Radarman, you are too kind.

And now to the conclusion of story:

Guest Ed Guest

On the wild ride back to the airport, I tried my cell phone, and gave thanks that I had subscribed for international service, because I was able to reach Amit at his apartment.

"Ed, you crazy man, why didn't you tell me that Mooney belonged to the Ugandan Minister of Defence? The Ugandan Air Force showed up here in two helicopters, questioning everybody!"

"Uh, because I didn't know whose Mooney it was. . . you didn't tell them which way I went, did you?"

"Of course not, when you're carrying my sister. . ."

"Oh, right, your sister," I replied sarcastically. "At any rate, your "sister" is safe and sound in Cairo, and a huge hit with the locals, as far as I can tell."

"Good," he said, "thank you for telling me that that. I was worried about her. . . and you, too, of course."

"Ah, right," I replied slowly. I went on, "So, where is the Uganda Air Force now?"

"Well, they left here at about four hours ago, flying north. In those old Bell 412's, they can't be much further than Aswan by now. But if I were you, I'd get out of Cairo-- Uganda has treaties with Sudan and Egypt, so they may get support from the local forces."

"Ah, good point," I admitted. "Okay, thanks for your help."

"May Allah go with you, my friend." And he hung up the phone.

As the taxi pulled up at the GA terminal at Cairo International, my heart again sank-- two Egyptian Air Force helicopters flanked the little Mooney, and armed troops stood guard around it. I'd never seen one in person, but from the outline, I'd have to guess they were US-built S-70A Black Hawks, and pretty well armed, to boot.

I knew I couldn't outrun a Black Hawk in any little prop plane, and I couldn't outfly their supersonic air-to-air missles in ANY craft, so I was going to have to leave Cairo without being detected.

I slipped down in the taxi seat, and said quietly to the driver, "Keep driving. Go to the charter terminal."

He didn't react, but I saw him smile and wave to one of the guards, and kept the car moving.

Arriving on the tarmac behind the charter terminal, I poked my head up and saw exactly what I was hoping to find-- an unattended Lear Jet 45. I've developed a great fondness for that aircraft, but you would think that for such an expensive piece of equipment, Bombardier would install more robust locks.

I approached the aircraft from the dark side away from the terminal, as the taxi sped away into the night. I slipped a thin leather pouch out of my wallet, containing a small assortment of hardened steel lock picks and a flexible "torque wrench," and within minutes the Lear's engines whined to life.

Doing my very best Omar Shariff imitation, I requested permission to taxi to the active, to remain in the pattern. No point in giving them any idea which way I was going, I thought.

At 140 knots, I pulled back the yoke and climbed to pattern altitude, and turned to the cross-wind, just like I was going to fly a touch and go. Turning to the downwind, I maintained the charade, until the tower gave me permission to perform my touch and go.

I acknowledged permission to land, and did my very best to disappear from the sky: dropping down to 500 feet above the terrain, I killed all the lights, dialed 330 knots into the autothrottle (the Do Not Exceed speed for the Lear) , and changed the number on my transponder to the same as a 737 that was on final for runway 5L. The last message I heard from the tower was a "Hold Short" instruction to a Cessna ready to go at runway 5R, saying "Caution the Lear Jet on short final." I just laughed, and said to myself, "Sorry, man, but this was an emergency."

I don't know if the Egyptian Air Force ever figured out which way I went, or if the Black Hawks ever came after me. With a maximum speed of 190 KIAS, they didn't stand much chance of catching me. I stay at 500 feet above the deck and avoided controlled airspace until I cleared the delta of the Nile, then I dropped to 100 feet above Mediterranean.

I maintained radio silence and flew dark, right above the water, until I was well outside of Egyptian airspace, and then climbed to FL390 at laid in a GPS course for Genoa, Italy-- it was after midnight, and I was getting hungry, and an authentic Genoa salami sandwich sounded good to me for some reason.

At dawn, I watched the sunrise over the mountains east of Genoa, and walked away from the Lear and caught a taxi to the nearest train station, carrying no luggage-- except for my new briefcase, "imported" from Uganda.

Ed

Guest Ed Guest

Postscript:

Several days later, I was strolling near my hotel in Zurich, with a nice, new Canadian passport in my pocket, acquired from a Bulgarian in Rome for a very reasonable price.

I happened to pass a newstand featuring international newspapers. Of all things, I found an english-language Egyptian newspaper. I picked it up, thinking there might be news of my recent visit to Cairo-- increased terrorist activity, aircraft theft, something or another. There was nothing.

But in the Entertainment Section of the paper, I did find a very upbeat article about Nazan and her band, the hottest new stars of the Cairo club scene. And there in the corner of the photograph, with a big smile on his face, was my old friend from Khartoum, Amit. Laughing

Ed

Pro Member First Officer
lkw First Officer

Didn't get around to following the last of your travels until now. I was going to suggest we send a search party out for you if you had not finished your saga. Thanks for the adventure. Very Happy

Pro Member Captain
Canyon (NoWorries) Captain

Cool story! I'm glad everything worked out! I kept imagining you writing this story while sitting on the floor of your prison cell somewhere in the Sahara!

If Microsoft only changed one thing for FS10, I would like them to add a "Remember where I parked my damn plane" option, so I could land in Phoenix, taxi to the gates, and then exit the game, when I start up, my plane is sitting at the gates in Phoenix, or Interlaken, or Inverness, or Montreal, or Hong Kong. And I would love it if it kept the little red line that shows where you've been forever. Now it just disappears for no real reason and I think it'd be a cool thing to show where you've been.

I know you said you're not into add-ons, but if you ever get curious, take a look at a De Havilland Dash-8 or DCH-6, they'd be perfect for your travels! They are crazily powerful, for that short-field take-off, but more importantly, they have huge wings and flaps that practically touch the ground, for that slow soft decent into unimproved airstrips.

And last, there's a little pizzeria right across the River from the train station, they have the best lasagna, have a blast in Zurich, and while you're there, why not fly the Rhine?!?!

Guest Ed Guest

Thanks, lkw and NoWorries,

I always enjoy thinking about why I'm flying when I fly in FS09, making up stories in my mind as I go. I think about how I came to have this expensive aircraft that I could never really afford, who I'm carrying, why they want to go where they're going, that sort of thing.

The story line of the Nile Tour, with the singer trying to go somewhere to be a big star, was almost a part of the Mississippi River tour I did a few weeks before, but the story never quite congealed in my mind. It was going to be a corporate aircraft and me the hired pilot, with the spoiled young daughter of the CEO blackmailing me to fly her and her band to New Orleans. I think Minneapolis and St. Louis were just not exotic enough in my mind (sorry, all you Midwesterners), and the reason for the blackmail just never formed in my mind (at least nothing I could write in a forum like this Wink ). Khartoum and Cairo and the "borrowed" Mooney just seemed to fit the bill.

The business of stealing a plane has figured in a number of my tour tales; after I played the PC game "Thief" and its sequels, the idea of stealing something really expensive seemed like it would fit well in a story (in fantasy only-- don't try this at home, kids). Wink

Anyhow, I'm glad some of you enjoyed it. I've been so busy with work lately, I've had very little time to fly. I actually started another Around the World tour, intending to fly over (or near) both of the Poles, but I started in Oregon and got as far as Los Angeles, before I ran out of free time. That was a couple of weeks ago.

Maybe, if I find a wealthy damsel-in-distress in Los Angeles who absolutely has to fly over the Poles to avoid some terrible fate. . . Laughing

Ed

Pro Member First Officer
michlin First Officer

Guest Ed,

I like your adventure. I believe you could possibly do well if you were to take up fiction writing and eventually try to publish it. You may be surprised with the results.. Very Happy

Pro Member First Officer
lkw First Officer

A news article about stolen aircraft last seen headed toward Mexico sparked an instant responce GuestEd! I recovered my Startan for Las Vagas a while back, was wondering if GuestEd is headed south of the border.

Actually I have notice a lot of new people on the forum lately and thought I would kick this to the top of the list in case they would like to enjoy Ed's adventures. Indiana Jone was named after their dog. What was your dog's name Ed? Very Happy (hope it isn't Fluffy or somthing like that) Very Happy

Pro Member Chief Captain
Tailhook Chief Captain

Nice story Ed Thumbs Up!

Guest Ed Guest

lkw wrote:

A news article about stolen aircraft last seen headed toward Mexico sparked an instant responce GuestEd! I recovered my Startan for Las Vagas a while back, was wondering if GuestEd is headed south of the border.

Actually I have notice a lot of new people on the forum lately and thought I would kick this to the top of the list in case they would like to enjoy Ed's adventures. Indiana Jone was named after their dog. What was your dog's name Ed? Very Happy (hope it isn't Fluffy or somthing like that) Very Happy

Well, I was surprised to see this one bumped again-- thanks, lkw!

No, it wasn't me in the plane headed for Mexico, although I like the idea-- reminds me of a song:

"And I've smuggled some smokes and folks from Mexico
Get baked by the sun, every time I go to Mexico
But I'm still willin' "

(Almost everything reminds me of a song Wink )

I've been incredibly busy with work for the past few months, 12 to 14 hours a day, six or seven days a week, so that I haven't had time for flying (or anything else fun, for that matter). But I am close to finishing that project, so hopefully I will be back in the mix and in the air more in future weeks. So lock up your aircraft! Twisted Evil

But to answer your question-- I don't even have a dog, but on other forums, I go by the name "Bruiser." Bruiser was a mean old tomcat who lived in our back yard for years. Is that macho-sounding enough for ya'? Laughing

Ed

Pro Member Chief Captain
ceetee Chief Captain

Great story, some very enterainting reading there! Good stuff Thumbs Up!

Pro Member Chief Captain
RadarMan Chief Captain

Guest Ed,
As soon as I saw this download I thought of you and your nefarious Twisted Evil deeds. It would be perfect.

http://library.avsim.net/search.php?SearchTerm=brassmkey.zip&CatID=root&Go=Search

Radar

Guest Ed Guest

RadarMan wrote:

Guest Ed,
As soon as I saw this download I thought of you and your nefarious Twisted Evil deeds. It would be perfect.

http://library.avsim.net/search.php?SearchTerm=brassmkey.zip&CatID=root&Go=Search

Radar

HA! I think you're right, RadarMan. Those are not exactly the sorts of airports where you take Aunt Minnie so she can fly to visit Cousin Flo in Minneapolis, are they? Laughing Especially the one with the camo tarp over the cargo-- those people can't be up to anything good, can they? Wink

Ed

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