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Hello and a question

Pro Member Trainee
crash_deplane Trainee

Glad I found this forum, it came in pretty handy when I Googled the reason why FS2004 was crashing with the kneeboard (lousy Viewpoint software). The question is with respect to the altimeter. Seems once I get above a certain altitude, ATC stops giving the altimeter setting, and today for the first time I got a little message box saying it was set wrong, but once I hit 'B' it just went to 29.92. So what is this certain altitude? I couldn't find it mentioned in the help.

7 Responses

Don Wood Guest

At and above 18,000 feet, 29.92 is the standard altimeter setting and all aircraft are supposed to set that in their altimeter. Below 18,000 feet, they should be using the actual altimeter setting for the closest reporting point to their position.

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

crash_deplane,

Welcome Aboard...!!! First to answer your question we all will need some information from you. What type of aircraft, did you ask for flight following, did you file a flight plan?

Regards,

Pro Member Chief Captain
Manuel Agustin Clausse (Agus0404) Chief Captain

Welcome to Fly Away!! 👍

Pro Member Chief Captain
Greekman72 Chief Captain

We also glad for joinning us crash_deplane...Welcome in Flyaway community. 😉

Pro Member Trainee
crash_deplane Trainee

Thanks for the welcome. I think Don already answered my question, but to answer Ed's question I was flying IFR from Cleveland to Miami in the 737. I had made my cruising altitude FL310, but during climb I got the message to reset the altimeter. I think 18,000 was about where the message popped up. Thanks again!
-Dave

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

crash_deplane,

Yes that would be correct. It is bezar that you had a flightplan and id not get the following. I must have seen you flying over my house in Va then...???

Regards,

Pro Member Trainee
FHeselton Trainee

But probably a little to far east to be over mine.

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