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Climbing out then no instruments

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

(KORF) (KIAD) I had sound of the engines only. ATC was trying to contact me but I could not reply. I pushed Avionics incase I had bumped it, that didn't work. I could do all of the views. The only setting that I had changed was instead of indicated air speed and on the medium stting for realism. I am using FS 9 with the CD rack 9.1, and 9.1 upgrade on FS. This has never happened before. Either I have to re-install or I have crashed and my machine seems to be ok.
Computer stats:
Pentium 4 2.6 gHz
MSI mother board with the latest BIOS
1 GB RAM DDR3
250 GB hard drive (western digital)
ATI Radeon 800 Pro 256 MB DDR3 Ram up dated drivers (Omega from this site through a link they seem to work just fine.
Sound card is onboard and has never given me any trouble of course things do go bad sometimes.
If anybody has ever had this happen let me know.
I would like any advice that I could get. I am opting for a re-install of FS9 at this point.

Thank you.

19 Responses

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

to mention the aircraft was 737-400 A1.

Pro Member First Officer
Canyon (NoWorries) First Officer

Your generators were off-line and your battery went flat.

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

That is something I didn't check. Maybe you have something there.

Thank you.

If anybody else has any ideas bring them on.

Pro Member First Officer
amermel First Officer

if your lights were till operational it might be a problem with your system

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

The system seems to be ok. Everything else is just fine. Soundcard is ok. But like I said it is intergrated on th MOBO. I am due to clean mysystem so I will be looking at the graphics card and making sure everything is seated.

Thank you.

Don Wood Guest

Forgetting for a moment what may have caused this on your computer and assume it happened in real life (and it does). What actions are you required to take in these circumstances:

In IFR conditions?

In VFR conditions?

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

I don't know. I don't have that experience yet. I am awaiting to learn oh great one.

Pro Member First Officer
antone First Officer

Don Wood wrote:

Forgetting for a moment what may have caused this on your computer and assume it happened in real life (and it does). What actions are you required to take in these circumstances:

In IFR conditions?

In VFR conditions?

1) Panic
2) Light cigarette
3) Look around for something that resembles an airport
4) Accidentally land on Interstate-95

Did I pass? 😂

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Don Wood wrote:

Forgetting for a moment what may have caused this on your computer and assume it happened in real life (and it does). What actions are you required to take in these circumstances:

In IFR conditions?

In VFR conditions?

In IFR and VFR I'd set my transponder to 7600 (I think thats the right code) and look for a local airfield and watch for light signals from the tower.
Not sure what the difference is in procedure between VFR and IFR Dont Know

Don Wood Guest

In VFR:

1. Remain VFR
2. Since ATC is trying to contact you, sqauk 7600 on the transponder as the earlier poster stated
3. Continue your flight or not at the pilot's discretion, remaining clear of controlled airspace, since radio contact is not required except in controlled airspace.
4. Upon approaching a controlled airport for landing, fly toward the tower at above pattern altitude, flashing landing lights. The tower will try and determine if you can hear them and then will clear you for landing by radio, if possible, or by coded lights if not.

In IFR:

1. Squak 7600.
2. Proceed via the last route assigned by ATC and comply with the IFR clearance.
3. If in radar vectors, proceed direct to the point of clearance in the vector then as cleared.
4. Maintain the highest of (1) assigned altitude in the last clearance received, (2) minimum charted altitude for the sector being flown, or (3) altitude ATC advised to be expected in a further clearance.
4. Commence an IFR approach at the destination at the ETA time specified in the flight plan.
5. If, at any time during the flight, the a/c flies into VFR conditions, the pilot is expected to remain VFR if possible and to land as quickly as practical, then notify ATC of the situation.
6. If alternate communications means exist (such as a cell phone), make contact with ATC and comply with any amended clearance received.
7. If instrument failure accompanies communications failure, squak 7700 for one minute followed by 7600.

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

This all looks good and I didn't consider all of this. I had no altimeter. I was still a climb to 6,000 feet and directed by last contact to 315 before picking up my GPS heading of 344. I think what I should have done if I read correctly is return to KORF, flashed my landing lights because I could not comminucate, and declare emergency by coding 7600? Did I get this correct? I was not prepaired and probaly should have paniced, light a cigarette, etc...

Don Wood Guest

edr1073: Almost correct. If you were VFR, then remain so and land at a close airport (or even off-airport if it can be safely done and is necessary to prevent re-entering IFR conditions).

7600 does not declare an emergency; it declares a communications failure. 7700 declares an emergency. Loss of both communications and instruments vital to IFR flight is a definite emergency.

Pro Member First Officer
Canyon (NoWorries) First Officer

The only problem with the squak code is that the transponder is kinda hooked to the electrical system...

If you're in a big bird, ATC will see you stop squaking, determine that you are still flying, and proceed to clear traffic out in front of you.

I don't know the way that the pilot should proceed, I would assume that he would attempt to fly the approach as well as memory served(the compass would still work, the VOR would not).

It is unlikely that you would lose all of this stuff at once. It is not impossible, but highly unlikely. A 737 has a generator on each engine, and a standby generator on the APU. The radios(2) will be powered off of different circuits, and even still, the tower can transmit voice over both the VOR station and the Localizer, so even if you lose both radios, you will still be listening to tower.

The only conceivable way I can think of losing all power is if you ran out of gas...or forgot to turn bring the generators on-line.

Don Wood Guest

Believe it or not, some pilots actually fly IFR in a/c less capable than a B-737. The FAR's regarding emergency actions in the event of communication failure, instrument failure, or both exist because it can happen. It is less likely in heavy a/c with their built-in redundancies but it is not impossible in any a/c.

A coomunication failure could occur without failure of the transponder or navigation radios in a number of ways. One is a short in the VFR antenna system. That would not necessarily effect the transponder. You could also lose the speaker/headset circuit so ATC would actually be able to hear you but you would not know that.

I have actually had a communicationj failure during flight (in my case, it was a bad micrphone switch). That would not be a problem in a large a/c but in a small one, with only one microphone, it is. That is why most pilots I know who fly light a/c also carry a handheld aviation transceiver.

Total communication failure now happens much less often than in the past when handheld transcievers and cell phones were not available but it is still possible and every IFR pilot is required to know the required actions when it does occur. That's why I asked the question originally.

Guest Ed Guest

antone wrote:

Don Wood wrote:

Forgetting for a moment what may have caused this on your computer and assume it happened in real life (and it does). What actions are you required to take in these circumstances:

In IFR conditions?

In VFR conditions?

1) Panic
2) Light cigarette
3) Look around for something that resembles an airport
4) Accidentally land on Interstate-95

Did I pass? 😂

😂 😂 😂 😂

Works for me!

Ed

Pro Member First Officer
Canyon (NoWorries) First Officer

Don Wood wrote:

Believe it or not, some pilots actually fly IFR in a/c less capable than a B-737. The FAR's regarding emergency actions in the event of communication failure, instrument failure, or both exist because it can happen. It is less likely in heavy a/c with their built-in redundancies but it is not impossible in any a/c.

A coomunication failure could occur without failure of the transponder or navigation radios in a number of ways. One is a short in the VFR antenna system. That would not necessarily effect the transponder. You could also lose the speaker/headset circuit so ATC would actually be able to hear you but you would not know that.

I have actually had a communicationj failure during flight (in my case, it was a bad micrphone switch). That would not be a problem in a large a/c but in a small one, with only one microphone, it is. That is why most pilots I know who fly light a/c also carry a handheld aviation transceiver.

Total communication failure now happens much less often than in the past when handheld transcievers and cell phones were not available but it is still possible and every IFR pilot is required to know the required actions when it does occur. That's why I asked the question originally.

Good points...I was addressing the original thread, where the plane was a 737, and it lost all electronics.

We could talk about different emergencies for hours, and it would probably be a great conversation, but I took your question to mean the exact failure as outlined by the original poster.

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

I did not re-insert my graphicscard this weekend. I just did the normal cleanup and read some of the settings by on of the forum members here on Flyaway. For some reason I have not had a repeat of the incident. But then I haven't been in the 737-400 only the Beech 350. So untill I try with the 737-400 I won't know how thing really are. I did update some Microsoft things this weekend, but it was only things for Outlook and nothing to do with the O/S.

Time will tell. Thanks everybody for your assistance and humor.

Wall Bashing

Pro Member First Officer
lkw First Officer

Thanks for the education Don us non real life pilots appreciate any input that will allow us to simulate the real world. 👍

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

I reflect the same to the information that you provided. I don't know if it will happen again but the air craft was still climbing to 6,000 feet and I think ATC was telling me to climb another incrimant??? I'll never know. But if it does happen again or even a flame out god forbib my guess would be to check the generators and try to bring them back on line and check circut breakers too. Then do th epanic, light a cigarette and kiss my 6 good bye...???

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