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Now here's something for you dictionary folks!

Pro Member Trainee
deKoven Trainee

Questions: Embarassed

Cowl Flaps (what are they for and do I adjust them?)

Pitot and pitot tube?

VOR2 Indicator (what's it for? Do I set it somehow?)

Boost Pump (do I use this? What for?)

Why the reference to Altimeter 2992? Are we stuck at that alt? All the altimeters I see in the planes have a small digital display which says '2992' and the ATC also makes reference to the same number.

I'm new guys; I'll take any help I can. If you have reading links I'll take those also.

I'm getting my Yoke and Pedals on Tuesday! Woot! Woot! 😂

5 Responses

Pro Member First Officer
Arkydave First Officer

deKoven wrote:

Questions: Embarassed

Cowl Flaps (what are they for and do I adjust them?)

Pitot and pitot tube?

VOR2 Indicator (what's it for? Do I set it somehow?)

Boost Pump (do I use this? What for?)

Why the reference to Altimeter 2992? Are we stuck at that alt? All the altimeters I see in the planes have a small digital display which says '2992' and the ATC also makes reference to the same number.

Aircraft altimeters work on barometric pressure. You're experiencing only 2992 because you're using the default weather, which is probably a good idea while you're learning to fly. Later you can select real-world weather and see the altimeter settings change as you fly from place to place.

Read the VFR Nav material in FS9 to learn about VOR2, and the Prop Aircraft section to learn about cowl flaps and boost pumps. A pitot tube extends out into the airstream outside your plane, and drives some of your instruments. The only thing you need to know about it is that, depending on the degree of realism you're using, you may have to apply pitot heat to keep it from freezing and causing bad readings.
-- Dave

Pro Member Trainee
deKoven Trainee

Hmmmm, so the "2992" is barometer reading 29.92 steady for those of us who aren't brave enough to add in real weather yet. Oy veh! Well, my yoke and pedals should get here Tuesday. Twisted Evil

Pro Member First Officer
Paiute First Officer

Cowl flaps are found on some turboprop aircraft. Their job is is to provide extra cooling air when the aircraft is working hard during the climb.. After reaching level flight the cowl flaps can be closed. In the flight sim nothing bad willl happen if you leave the cowl flaps open all the time.

The barometric reading of 29.92 is standard for all aircraft flying above 18,000 feet (flight level 180). The airspace above 18,000 is considered to be "Positive Control Airspace" and all aircraft should be on IFR flight plans, with the crew instrument rated. Below 18,000 the flight sim uses 29.92 when fair weather has been chosen and the barometer will remain steady over long distrances. 😂

spuddi Guest

If you level up and change the 29.92 to something else you'll see that the height on the altimeter changes. which is important to know if your coming into land.

If you go to land at another airport and the local controller gives you another setting (say 30.26) you'll find the altimeter is wrong when you land, (I almost overshot Jersey airport because of this)

I've found that the controllers only seem to give you different barometer values if you have loaded the real world weather.

Pro Member First Officer
leadfoot First Officer

Cowl flaps are also used on piston aircraft, more so than on turboprops. Piston engines just can't live with high heat like a turboprop. Cowl flaps are most common on radial engines I.E. DC-3, B-17, B-29 Things of that nature. Cessna 182s 206s and 210s have them, most all twins, Mooneys, etc.

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