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how do you stop a stall

boeing772 Guest

does anybody know how to stop a stall?

7 Responses

Pro Member First Officer
antone First Officer

Increase power, pitch down. Seems counterintuitive to pitch down when the plane is descending rapidly, but if you think about what causes a stall, it makes more sense.

There's a lesson in the learning center that covers the topic - worth looking at, if cheesy.

Pro Member Captain
Welshflyer Captain

Nicely put 😀 !

Pro Member Chief Captain
Tailhook Chief Captain

I admit I don't know what it says in the lesson. I have found though that to recover from a stall depends entirely on the type of aircraft and other factors such as torque, speed and whether I can figure out my attitude before it's too late.
Try the Raptor, it goes into a stall before you can blink your eyes - if you put the pedal to the metal to recover, you'll tear the wings off. Not much of a recovery, is it. 😳

Pro Member Captain
Welshflyer Captain

Tailhook wrote:

I admit I don't know what it says in the lesson. I have found though that to recover from a stall depends entirely on the type of aircraft and other factors such as torque, speed and whether I can figure out my attitude before it's too late.
Try the Raptor, it goes into a stall before you can blink your eyes - if you put the pedal to the metal to recover, you'll tear the wings off. Not much of a recovery, is it. 😳

😀 😀 😀 Ever lowered the flaps/thrust vectors on a harrier? Talk about stall, it just goes vertical, probably just the model i have though 😳 !

Pro Member Chief Captain
Tailhook Chief Captain

The Harrier? Everytime I take off it starts smoking... must be doing something wrong. I got pics to prove it but don't want to embarrass myself too much 🍅

Pro Member First Officer
antone First Officer

Tailhook wrote:

I admit I don't know what it says in the lesson. I have found though that to recover from a stall depends entirely on the type of aircraft and other factors such as torque, speed and whether I can figure out my attitude before it's too late.
Try the Raptor, it goes into a stall before you can blink your eyes - if you put the pedal to the metal to recover, you'll tear the wings off. Not much of a recovery, is it. 😳

Fair enough, I guess I should clarify - since a stall can happen at any speed or altitude, it's not correct that one should always apply power to save it. I can't think of a way, in any A/C, to save a stall without pitching down.

Pro Member First Officer
Tartanaviation First Officer

Most importantly dont find yourself in a stalling situation. Recognise the symtoms of an approaching stall.

1- Increasingly Slow airspeed
2- Sloppy ineffective controls
3- Buffet of the Nose
4- Possible stall warner sounding
5- Unusually high nose attitude for the manoeuver being flown.

Normal Stall

Release back pressure from Control column to allow the nose to lower in a controlled manner. Do not, however, over lower the nose, remember a good SSR is one with a minimal loss of height. On approach or takeoff you may not have the luxury of lots of height below you to work with. Smoothly Apply Full Power and use apply rudder to counteract any adverse yaw. Do not move the ailerons at all until you have noted that the airspeed has increased to a speed above the stall speed. The wings are now unstalled so you can operate the ailerons and increase the attitude again, easing the aircraft into a climb.

Stall with spin

As before this time pay attention to greater use of the rudder. Apply opposite yaw to the direction of spin to ease the aircraft out of the spin. Before applying the rudder verify the direction of rudder required by referring to the slip ball turn coordinator. Again when the aircraft airspeed has increased sufficiently and the wings are unstalled you can then use the ailerons to correct the flight attitude and ease the aircraft into a safe climb. Most proabably you will practice a Stall with a spin when using full flap. Make sure that once the aircraft has come out of the spin you take away the drag flap. Then once you have a positive rate of climb after applying full power, take away the final stage of flap.

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