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mcdonnell douglas

Pro Member Captain
atreyu Captain

i heard that mcdonnell douglas (md-80 series and dc-9 series) don't have to have a pushback truck because since the engines are in the back it can just do reverse thrust to pushback, but not all airports allow it. has anyone else heard that or seen it? and if anyone has any pics or videos that would be nice too 😀

Pro Member Captain
John Hodges (originalgrunge) Captain

Yep, I fly on them most often (Usually from LGA to MDW or ORD) and hadn't even heard of a pushback truck until I finally flew in a couple of regional jets and actually had to wait to hear the engines start up! It certainly saves a lot of time at airports where that can be done, and where it is allowed it is usually encouraged! (I.E. LaGuardia)

Pro Member First Officer
George (OrlandoGeorge) First Officer

We had this discussion about 6 months back and I was rightly corrected on one of my observations. You guys are right that the DC-9, MD 80, 88, 90's and the Folkker F-100 usually do a power back from the gates. The only change I have heard about latley is the issue of cost savings in terms of fuel.

Rumor has it that many airlines here in the US are opting for a push back Tug right now so as to avoid gunning all that fuel into the engines when it it is not absolutly necessary. --Having said that I am sure that there are powerbacks being executed routinely today all over.

Do you guys do the thrust reverse fan/powerback in FS9 or opt for SHIFT+P mostly?

Pro Member First Officer
sylvan First Officer

In 35 years of watching aircraft I've never seen an aircraft use reverse thrust for push back in the UK. I know I have read that they do in the US but one question - does the pilot stick his head out of the window as you would while reversing car? This option does not always work as I've hit a few things by doing the same in a car (lamp posts, signs, people). I would think if reverse thrust is used the pilot/first officer would need ground observation help so they don't crash into a taxiing B777. Suppose my question is - WHY?

Pro Member Chief Captain
Matthew Shope (mypilot) Chief Captain

Would they encourage that at an airport say LAX?

Pro Member Captain
John Hodges (originalgrunge) Captain

Yes it's true, they would need ground observation doing this for sure! But that is different from having to get the service equipment out to push the plane back, line it up on the taxiway, start engines, connect/disconnect the intercom, etc. It really is a time saver for a small but busy airport like LGA, where you want the planes out of the way and ready to go.

Pro Member Trainee
Alex (Littleal100) Trainee

Airplanes even with there engines on the wings can push back useing reverse thrust. also, md80's can use a pushback trucks, i live right near Kfll, then Do-Not alow Pushbacks using reverse thrust. 😂

Pro Member Chief Captain
Chris102 Chief Captain

I think using the Reverse Thrust would be better, especially at large airports, to promptly get to the runway without having to wait for a pushback truck.

Pro Member Trainee
Alex (Littleal100) Trainee

in some cases....

Pro Member Trainee
Alex (Littleal100) Trainee

but it uses alot of fuel.

Pro Member First Officer
George (OrlandoGeorge) First Officer

The Powerback:

Of course when an aircraft does a powerback using it's thrust reversers here in the US there is ample ground support available such as a set of wing walkers and an aircraft Marshall in charge. The Marshall runs the show and the pilot follows his direction as it is seen through the windshield/windscreen.

The Marshall brings the A/C forward to increase the rpm on the engines and then the Marshall rolls his wands in much the same way as you would quickly move one fist over the other in a direction away from the body. This means that the pilot in charge should engauge the reversers and that the aircraft should begin the backward roll. This continues on until the Marshall stops the movement as indicated.

When the aircraft has gained enough distance from the gate and ramp area, the agent in charge/Aircraft Marshall will halt the progress of the aircraft where needed by slowing his hand signal/movement and issuing the authorized accompanying signal to slow and ultimately to stop with directional wands in the crossed position. The throttle quad. is now in the neutral configuration.

To end the proceedure, the signal to move the aircraft in the pre-described direction is given by the aircraft marshall and then the pilot is properly saluted. -The pilot will flash his nose wheel light to indicate that he has assumed full command and as a courtesy to say "thank you" and "goodbye."

I Learned the Powerback marshalling proceedure while I was with Delta Airlines at KAUS (Austin, Texas.) and was frequently working with MD80/88/90 aircraft equipment types.

-Anyone else with experience in this area, I for one would be interested in hearing about your area proceedures. 🙂

Pro Member Chief Captain
Insight Chief Captain

what I want to know is if they have one of those reversing beeper messages installed

"this bloody great aircraft, is reVERsing!"

😀

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