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Braking

Pro Member Captain
Kareem El-Sadi (crosscheck9) Captain

In real life, when an aircraft brakes, does it dip downwards as far down as it does in the sim?

7 Responses

Pro Member Chief Captain
hinch Chief Captain

the brakes aren't as poweful in real life so i don't imagine so.

Pro Member Captain
Bindolaf Captain

If you step on them hard, yes. And you can damage your landing gear and tyres too.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Greekman72 Chief Captain

I think that aircarfts are using some electronic equipment in order to have a controlled smooth breaking.
Systems like ABS(Antilock Brake System),EBD(Electronic Brake-force Distributor),EPS(Electronic Power Steering),ESP(Electronic Stability Program)starts from aircrafts before pass to our cars.

Pro Member Captain
jarred_01 Captain

I would say you are probably right Greekman.

Hopefully Microsoft will think of some sort of system for the next FS that allows you to vary manual (not autobrake) brake pressure, and not just slamming on the brakes!

Pro Member First Officer
PH First Officer

In the real world if you use max autobrake remember to remove the traytables from the passengers foreheads while they disembark. Seriously when you brake in the sim you apply full pressure...for real you brake as you do in a car slowly increasing pressure...unless you are running out of runway then my point above applies!

Pro Member Captain
jarred_01 Captain

Just to go off topic (sorry!), at the point in a braking system where you are using the highest amount of possible pressure before the brakes lock up, will that always stop you faster than if you locked up the brakes?

Secondly, is it possible to lock up an aeroplanes brakes?

Pro Member Chief Captain
Greekman72 Chief Captain

jarred_01 wrote:

Just to go off topic (sorry!), at the point in a braking system where you are using the highest amount of possible pressure before the brakes lock up, will that always stop you faster than if you locked up the brakes?

Secondly, is it possible to lock up an aeroplanes brakes?

I can ensure that most aircrafts are using the ABS system.
ABS in dry runways increase the length of breaking but you always have the control.
Lock whells do anything they like and you have no control of the craft or vehicle in general.

In wet runways happens the opposite.
When the ABS sensors feel that the whells going to lock they reduce pressure and the whells dont lock.
Of course this happens(increase-decrease of pressure) in very short time.
In a wet runway a lock whells vehicle continue drift with the same or a litle less speed before breaking and needs a lot of place to stop and you have no control at all.
With ABS the vehicle-craft keep the route and stops right on time.

Sorry if i cant use the right terminology in English. Embarassed

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