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Takeoff procedure

Pro Member Trainee
mitch0508 Trainee

hi

i just wanted to know, when your taking off what procedures do you have to take like do you have to put flaps down or anything or do you just accelerate and then pull up?

thanks 😀

14 Responses

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

On the ground...

- Line up with the center line on the runway
- Set flaps if necessary
- Release parking brake
- Increase thrust to 40% N1
- Let the engines stabilise
- Set TakeOff thrust which is anywhere between 87-100% N1
- Accelerate to VR which is rotation speed
- Slowly pull back on the joystick until you see a positive rate of climb on the VSI

In the air...

- Gear up
- Climb at an attitude of 15 degrees until 1000ft
- Reduce pitch to 12 degrees thereafter and retract one increment of flaps
- As speed increases, retract the rest of the flaps
- Climb at 250 KIAS to 10,000ft.

Rough guide...

Pro Member Captain
bawls327 Captain

also depends on what airport your at, and what plane you are flying. Some airplanes have their own checklist but we need to know what plane you are talking about.

Pro Member Trainee
mitch0508 Trainee

thanks 99jolegg for your reply but do you know how much flaps you have to put on if your in a 737. i mostly fly 737s and 747s.

Pro Member Captain
bawls327 Captain

Whats the runway length at your airport you are taking off, what are the conditions of the runway, how heavy are you?

Pro Member First Officer
zakk hutton (chez64) First Officer

every takeoff is different try the learning centre on fsx for some suggestions or do the checkride missions on fsx (also in the learning centre)

Pro Member First Officer
Jim Lapinsky (7ECA-Captain) First Officer

It always comes to the basics. Go through the tutorials and gradually move up to bigger more complex aircraft as you gain proficiency. Same as in the real world. Even 747 Captains had to start flying a humble Cessna 150 or 172.

You should be very comfortable flying singles, and twins working up through more and more complex types towards jets and the 737,747 types These aircraft has an extensive checklist which you should if not follow exactly, be somewhat familiar with. Also in the tutorial you will find notes on how to fly each type and goes over the basics of Starting, taxiing, take off, climb, cruise, and of course landing. These are great to print off and keep in a binder for reference.

In aviation in the real world you would never try to fly an aircraft you are not fully trained on and are rated as competent to operate. All speeds numbers and performance data must be easily recalled and commited to memory. The alternative is what we refer to as an Aviation Incident or Occurance.

Pro Member First Officer
zakk hutton (chez64) First Officer

and remember too FSX IS NOT A CERTIFIED TRAINING PROGRAM,

Pro Member First Officer
Jim Lapinsky (7ECA-Captain) First Officer

Really??? Darn that means I'll have to quit my day job flying 747's for Air Canada. I've been logging FSX as Sim Time! 😳

Pro Member First Officer
Concorde105 First Officer

Hee hee! 😂

Pro Member First Officer
zakk hutton (chez64) First Officer

well i dont think it is rated by the CAA ect.. as an official training program
you can use it for personal stuff but not for examinations, licences and so on

Pro Member First Officer
zakk hutton (chez64) First Officer

i found this on the learning centre "Logging Time

I'm often asked if pilots can log the time they spend "flying" Flight Simulator. At present in the United States, the answer is no. The FAA issued Advisory Circular AC61–126, "Qualification and Approval of Personal Computer-Based Aviation Training Devices," on May 12, 1997. With AC61–126, the FAA took a small, first step toward recognizing the value of computer-based simulations. The advisory circular lays out the requirements for an approved training device. Only a few systems have been approved thus far, in part because the requirements include expensive consoles for switches and controls. More to the point, even if you're using an approved PCATD, you can log only 10 hours of the training required for an initial instrument rating, provided that the practice time is conducted under the direct supervision of an authorized flight instructor. You cannot use a PCATD to log the approaches and other maneuvers required to maintain IFR currency, nor can you use an approved PCATD for instrument proficiency checks, to log solo time, or to meet any of the flight time requirements for a private pilot certificate."

yeah you can use it for training but cant log OFFICIAL hours on it until they officially approve it

Pro Member First Officer
Jim Lapinsky (7ECA-Captain) First Officer

I'd think even if not certified, the proceedures for IFR for example are good enough to qualifiy. I've heard differing views in Canada some say it is loggable, others say not. As I'm likely not going to get an IFR rating for the ol Citabria for a while it really doesn't matter. But if you can use IFR manual and texts and work out IFR approaches and proceedures as well as FSX does, then I see no reason it wouldn't be able to be certified and the trainig applied. Of course you would need to verify competence and have an instructor be able to verify and sign off on your training, but hey why not?

Pro Member First Officer
zakk hutton (chez64) First Officer

yeah its great for trainingand loads of people use it but i dont think its official yet

Pro Member Trainee
Kc (puppy-paw) Trainee

you should look through the planes manule!

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