Fly Away Simulation
SearchSearch 

STAR's

Pro Member Trainee
glen4cindy Trainee

Being an AVID aviation person, I am always anxious to learn everything I can, and after every flight I like to talk to the pilots. Southwest Airlines pilots are always more accomidating than any others I have talked to, but, none have ever brushed me off. I just tell them that I am a Flyboy wannabe, and they are usually glad to assist me.

Anyway, on my last flight, I was told that we took the QBALL6 STAR into STL which is about 12 miles from my home. I looked up that STAR and was astounded to find that the procedure actually began so far from the field.

In looking up the STAR's and other procedures at AIRNAV and AOPA, I saw similar fixes and intersections and hold circles present on each one. I was wondering if there was a chart available that had all of the STAR's combined on 1 chart.

Thanks for your help.

Pro Member Captain
David (The-GPS-Kid) Captain

There's a piece of software available from www.simw.com called "Sim Plates" that has pretty much all US STARS details.... (plus a selection from Europe).

Check it out, and see if it's what you're after.

Pro Member First Officer
Martin (Blake14) First Officer

STAR?????????? what is that? I heard about it but don't know what it is

Pro Member Chief Captain
RadarMan Chief Captain

Blake14 wrote:

STAR?????????? what is that? I heard about it but don't know what it is

This should explain it.

http://www.navdata.at/php/sidstar/sidstar.php

Radar

Pro Member Trainee
glen4cindy Trainee

Thank you very much, I will check that out.

Blake: STAR is STandard Terminal Arrival.

Check www.airnav.com and look up a major airport, and near the bottom, you can pull up STAR's, Departure procedures, and all the published approaches for each runway the airport has, RNAV, NDB, ILS, etc.

Pro Member First Officer
Martin (Blake14) First Officer

thanks for the info all of you

Pro Member First Officer
Martin (Blake14) First Officer

I want to make sure I am understanding this well. ARe the STAR's the approach charts to the airports? The ones that they give you in FS9 in the lessons in the instrument ratings. If yes, I am highly familiar with those. I just didn't know the name.
THanx

Don Wood Guest

This may be just as matter of semantics but STAR's are not approach charts. The approach charts are GPS, ILS, VOR, or NDB procedures that begin within 10-15 miles of the destination runway and terminate with a landing.

STAR's are defined and published procedures for arriving at the place where you can begin your approach and start a much further distance from the destination (25-100 miles-sometimes further).

Their close cousin is the SID (Standard Instrument Departure). Both SID's and STAR's are a simple and condensed way for the pilot and controller to communicate sometimes lengthy and complicated instructions for turns, fixes, and altitude assignments.

Pro Member First Officer
Martin (Blake14) First Officer

OOH Ok, SO the STAR's get you to the place where you start your approach on the approach charts. But do pilots use them often?

Don Wood Guest

SID's and STAR's are used extensively in commercial and airline operations and, to as lesser degree, in general aviation operations. In the US, a SID or a STAR can be issued by ATC for any instrument flight plan unless the filed flight plan states "No SID/STAR" in the comments section.

The reasons GA pilots don't use them as often is that GA operations are more often single pilot and a SID/STAR is another chart that has to be handled, understood, and complied with during low level operations. Some STAR's are also designed for jet performance and light prop planes are not capable of flying them due to climb rates.

Pro Member Trainee
glen4cindy Trainee

[quote="Don Wood"
STAR's are defined and published procedures for arriving at the place where you can begin your approach and start a much further distance from the destination (25-100 miles-sometimes further).
[/quote]

Yes, STAR can be what I would call very far from the area where the runway procedures begin. The STAR that I mentioned in the first post begins at a FIX called VISQA which is located in Tennessee just west of KBNA. This is a pretty good distance from KSTL!

All times are GMT Page 1 of 1

Related Questions