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becoming a pilot

Pro Member Captain
atreyu Captain

hey im thinking of being a pilot and i was just wondering if it would be better to go to a flying school and fly props when i graduate and then move up to jets, or go through the airforce and go straight to jets (thats what my uncle did). so i was wondering what you guys think would be a better way to go. o and sorry if this in the worng section.

Pro Member Captain
Germán Campopiano (Oberkomando) Captain

Well, i am thinking the same, i want to be a pilot too, and i´m thinking the exact thing, if i get in to the air force or comertial airplanes?, as well i´m thinking what will i do when i get retired, 🙄
i´ll like to be a military pilot but i´ll like to be a comertial pilot to so, wile i think in my last year i already decide that i will study first aeronautic engennering, and then i´ll see. (comertial or military) ❓

Guest Ed Guest

You don't say where you are or which air force you're considering. But here's a consideration-- how do feel about killing people you don't know, and having them try to kill you? There is this war going on right now. . .

I'm a veteran. There is a tendency to view the military as an educational opportunity, an alternative to college, and so on. This image is promoted by the armed forces in their recuitment advertising. And it can be that; I started my career of the last 30+ years with the training I got in the navy.

But keep in mind that the main purpose of the military is not to provide education to young people, it is to apply deadly force to solve problems, as perceived by your political leaders. If you're okay with doing that, whether your agree with the political leaders currently in office, those who may be in office in the future, the military might be for you.

Just keep in mind that there is a high price to pay for that education-- maybe the ultimate price.

Ed

Pro Member Captain
atreyu Captain

i was thinking of mcchord afb in seattle, and being a cargo pilot

Pro Member Captain
Germán Campopiano (Oberkomando) Captain

yes, i thought about it, about killing people, the problem is that i am not American there for we are not in war.
Yes i always think about my personalaty, and trying to "gues" what am i going to do.
i think i dont want to be in the air force, 80% sure.
but thanks any way. 🙂

Pro Member Captain
Jon Van Duyn (JVD) Captain

I can't say too much but every one in my family says I've been wanting to fly since the age of two[ridicuolus]. Enough about me, I wouldn't recommend flying for the air force unless your parents struggle to pay for the lessons and they pay you nothing.Then again those planes are fun to fly and isn't that why most of us want to fly [for fun].

I am about to start gliding lessons every weekend. The reason I have chosen gliding is , it will be unlikely for me to get scared of weather, it's cheap, good rudder practice, good for the CV and I won't worry about engine failiures when I start flying the Props and Jets.



Last edited by Jon Van Duyn (JVD) on Sun Aug 07, 2005 9:25 pm, edited 1 time in total
Pro Member Captain
Germán Campopiano (Oberkomando) Captain

WELL YES, Have fun glidering, i hope u like it, i´ve donnit, in the past i enjoy it.
so do u 😀

Pro Member Captain
Jon Van Duyn (JVD) Captain

Sorry about being a bit off topic but do you think with a Dutch or South African Passport I will be able to fly the RAF or USAF ❓

Pro Member First Officer
Jason (Av8r77) First Officer

I don't know how old you are at the present time, but if you want to look towards the Air Force here's some stuff to think about.

1. It is extremely competetive. There is a major abundance of pilots (mainly co-pilots) right now in the USAF. The is causing a lower amount of people to be selected as pilots.

2. Your commitment is 10 years upon getting your wings after Undergraudate Pilot Training. That is a hearty invenstment into most people's lives, no matter who you are.

3. Deployments. You can plan on them! Too many people don't think about what it's like to be away from home, wife, kids, etc for 3- 6 months at a time.

I'm not trying to deter you, but give a dose of what it's like. The job is VERY demanding, but also more rewarding than anything else I could ever think of doing.

As far as the comment about killing people, I salute you for your service and respect what you have done for our country. However, there are many platforms within the Air Force that don't directly have a "finger on the trigger." I fly Combat Search and Rescue and my job is to help those that are wounded or stranded if they've been shot down.

Other than a fighter, AC-130, A-10, or B-52 there aren't many airframes that support weapons systems. If you have no desire to fly one of those airframes, you'll be ok, since most want to fly those planes out of UPT in the first place.

The military is a great place to get educational benefits, but your job comes first. Most everyone that signs up knows that as a fact, or learns it rather quick shortly thereafter.

To be honest, I don't know what the comment about "your political leaders" even refers to. The President is the Commander in Chief, and you follow the directives that are set forth by him/her. It's pointless to get into a political mudsling on this board since it's not the place for it. However, the main difference between working for the Military and AT&T is simple; AT&T isn't going to as you to die for the company.

Do the research and look into ROTC and other branches as well. Don't limit yourself to just aviation. Get a degree in something that you can fall back on when times get tough, such as after Sept 11.

You have to be a US citizen to join the US Military. I don't know about the RAF though.

Good luck!

Pro Member Captain
Jon Van Duyn (JVD) Captain

I am pretty used to the fact of not seeing family for months on end, Infact I'm doing it right now. I am also used to the competitiveness of other jobs.
As you say I musn't limit myself to flying but seen as I am so keen on aircraft I am likely to do an Aerospace Engineering degree and propbably Maths in order to stay around aircraft.

Anyway thanks for the info 😀 . I'll sit down think a little further into what my carrer should be and why.

Pro Member Captain
atreyu Captain

thats what i was thinking, i don't want to go in the airforce and then go into war. does anyone know how long it will take to be in a flight school so you can fly props afterwards? and then go to jets?

Pro Member Captain
Jared Captain

Well depending how often you go to your flight school and how much money you have. It takes soooo amny hours of time and soooooooooooo much money. Thousands of dollars. It will also take you a long time to go from a private pilot to a commercial rating. Don't expect anytime soon.

Pro Member First Officer
Jason (Av8r77) First Officer

There are some Academies that can take you from zero time to Regional Airlines in about a year. They are rather pricey as stated before.

I spent about $14,000 getting my everything up through my commercial rating. It took me about 3 years off and on of training.

Pro Member Captain
atreyu Captain

14,000 to become a commercail pilot? wow thats alot, but itll pay for its self when you work for an airline

Guest Ed Guest

Av8r77,

You gave a very well thought out and well expressed response, much more so than mine. But I think we are both saying much the same thing; a commitment to military service should not be thought of just as an opportunity for training. It is a serious decision with far reaching implications for yourself, your family, and your country.

As far as the "finger on the trigger," no, I was never in that position. On the other hand, I did support the deployment of nuclear weapons throughout the world. If somebody pulled the trigger, I was doing my part to be sure ours landed where they were supposed to land. If that horrible day had come, I would have felt no less responsible for the deaths of millions, if not billions, of people. Not that I would have survived more than a few minutes to think about it, of course.

My comment about political leaders was supposed to be ambiguous and non-specific. Lord knows I don't want to start that discussion here. But, as you state, the current president is the CinC of the US armed forces, no questions asked. If you don't care for the policies of this CinC or the next one or the one after that, tough luck, soldier-- you still follow his/her orders.

And I salute you, Av8r77.

Ed

Guest Ed Guest

Oberkomando wrote:

yes, i thought about it, about killing people, the problem is that i am not American there for we are not in war.
Yes i always think about my personalaty, and trying to "gues" what am i going to do.
i think i dont want to be in the air force, 80% sure.
but thanks any way. 🙂

Oberkomando,

Your country may not be at war now. That is no guarantee you won't find yourself at war five or ten years from now.

Unless you have Swiss citizenship. 😉

Ed

Pro Member Chief Captain
Matthew Shope (mypilot) Chief Captain

atreyu wrote:

hey im thinking of being a pilot and i was just wondering if it would be better to go to a flying school and fly props when i graduate and then move up to jets, or go through the airforce and go straight to jets (thats what my uncle did). so i was wondering what you guys think would be a better way to go. o and sorry if this in the worng section.

Depends on what you want to do. I like flying with my own instructor. I'm not sure how the Air Force does it. So far my parents have paid almost $2,000. It' alot of fun though! 😀

Pro Member First Officer
Jason (Av8r77) First Officer

Air Force UPT is 52 weeks long is pretty faced paced. However, it's not impossible. You can plan on roughly 12 hour days when you fly and about 10 hours when you don't. You'll be in the books studying constantly, learning bold face, and preparing for your next flight.

The first flying phase is all VFR stuff. Second phase incorporates instruments. Third phase is formation and acrobatics.

Most people take Saturday off and are back in the books Sunday-Friday. There are also check-rides at the end of every phase. The way the military teaches is different that civilian. Some have to "unlearn" things they were doing out in the civilian world for training differences.

In all, I look at it this way: I get paid to do what I love to do. Of course it isn't all fantastic, it is the military. But, I have no complaints about my decision.

Pro Member Captain
Germán Campopiano (Oberkomando) Captain

the problem is, how much is a pilot carrer? in US 🙄

Pro Member First Officer
Jason (Av8r77) First Officer

Your commitment is 10 years upon getting your Pilot Wings.

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