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DC3 Radio-Range navigation

Pro Member First Officer
lkw First Officer

The Radio Range Project Team proudly announces the availability of the Beta Test version of our "gauge and scenery"

Blerb out of readme
Welcome to the era of navigating with the Four Course Radio Range. This is the durable, low-frequency system that was used from the 1930s into the 1950s when VOR navigation was introduced.

You may know this as the A and N system ... if an aircraft was off the beam to one side, the pilot heard the Morse code sound for the letter A, dit dah. Off course on the other side of the beam, he heard the Morse code sound for the letter N, dah dit.

When an aircraft was "flying the Beam," these two Morse code sounds merged into a solid tone.

This Radio Range System is compatible only with FS2004. It includes a Radio Range Gauge for the aircraft and Add-On Scenery to place most 1940 period Radio Range Stations on the ground that were in the Eastern half of the US. The Scenery files also provide visual radio range stations at the correct location.

Pro Member Chief Captain
CRJCapt Chief Captain

Great to see a add on program like this. I am a student of Aviation and I love the historical methods of flying used by pilots of yesteryear. Back in those days, pilots had to be good or you just didn't come back. We have lost some of the skills that pilots back then used daily. Now days, we push buttons, follow the GPS on autopilot and do what ever ATC wants. We let ATC tell use where the rain is instead of studying a weather chart. I want to learn celestial navigation. I would love to try four course navigation. Not that I don't like the new, safer forms of navigation but I want the adventure and thrill of doing something that demands more skill. Todays pilots what to fly airplanes like they drive cars. Even in flight sim, pilots want to jump in a 747 when they can't even land a C-172. I love all aspects of flying and what to use my skill, judgment and spirit of adventure to complete my flights. After all, isn't that why we fly?

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