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Wheel Cover Codes

Pro Member Chief Captain
ceetee Chief Captain

I have noticed this both in real life and on the sim.

Can anyone tell me what the code on the wheel cover of aircraft mean?

Confused Thanks.

Pro Member Captain
Taylor (Flyboy92) Captain

i'm not sure but i have one suggestion for that one! don't take this in offense anyone but

- GreekMan -

Flyboy92

p.s. please don't be offended Sad

Pro Member Chief Captain
ceetee Chief Captain

I am totally lost Confused

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

I think its just part of the serial number so they can tell at a glance what age the components are and verify where they were made and when etc.

It is more than likely something to do with the first part of this post:

https://forum.flyawaysimulation.com/forum/topic/15286/c-n/

Sorry I can't be specific Wink

Pro Member Chief Captain
pilotwannabe Chief Captain

Aren't the two letters the last two digits of the registration??

I.e. A virgin 747 with registration G-VXLG would have LG on the wheel well. I assume its becasue the LG part is the unique part of the registration....and so it can be identified quickly by ground crew etc.

Wink

Pro Member Chief Captain
Greekman72 Chief Captain

Flyboy92 wrote:

i'm not sure but i have one suggestion for that one! don't take this in offense anyone but

- GreekMan -

Flyboy92

p.s. please don't be offended Sad

Big Grin ROFL

Pro Member Chief Captain
hms_endeavour Chief Captain

That came to my mind too as soon as I saw the pic Laughing

Pro Member Chief Captain
CrashGordon Chief Captain

Me too. Laughing

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Just had a thought along the same lines as PW...yes, it can be identified by groundcrew so they don't have to walk 30 metres and strain their necks looking at the side of the aircraft but also from the ground by ATC and any aircraft spotter - unless that is what you meant...

Wink

Pro Member Chief Captain
CrashGordon Chief Captain

99jolegg wrote:

Just had a thought along the same lines as PW...yes, it can be identified by groundcrew so they don't have to walk 30 metres and strain their necks looking at the side of the aircraft but also from the ground by ATC and any aircraft spotter - unless that is what you meant...

Wink

Sure don't want them straining their necks Laughing



Last edited by CrashGordon on Mon Jun 12, 2006 1:57 pm, edited 1 time in total
Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

CrashGordon wrote:

99jolegg wrote:

Just had a thought along the same lines as PW...yes, it can be identified by groundcrew so they don't have to walk 30 metres and strain their necks looking at the side of the aircraft but also from the ground by ATC and any aircraft spotter - unless that is what you meant...

Wink

Sure don't want them straining their necls. Laughing

...or we would have even more compensation claims Rolling Eyes

Wink

Pro Member Chief Captain
pilotwannabe Chief Captain

Here's a question about Wheel wells....

Why do 737's not have them?? Wink

e.g. http://www.jetphotos.net/viewphoto.php?id=5726220

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Do you mean the code on the nose gear or are you referring to the 737 not having main gear covers at all?

They don't have main gear covers because it requires a lot of extra engineering and provides another aspect to go wrong so it reduces the safety or an aircraft. On most aircraft, if the latch to open landing gear doors breaks, then it is left to gravity which doesn't always work. Get rid of these doors, and you don't have a problem. They probably tested the aircraft and found that the drag coefficient increased minutely from not having landing gear doors - a problem that is lessened by the fact that the landing gear is small in the first place, and 737s are only used on long haul so wouldn't make a massive difference to fuel consumption.

Obviously, you wouldn't see a 747 without gear doors because the gear are huge and cover a larger surface area so the drag coefficient would increase a lot and combined with the fact that they often fly for 12 or more hours, it would mean a drastic increase in fuel.

In short, for the purpose built 737, there isn't too much of a reason to have them, so why bother wasting the money? Wink

Pro Member Chief Captain
pilotwannabe Chief Captain

Thanks Jon Thumbs Up!

Isnt it dangerous though to leave the gear exposed. I mean for example if it was raining on the ground and water got into some moving parts and then froze at altitude wouldnt this crack and/or rust the struts etc. causing a huge disaster when the plane touches down.

Wink

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Look at the photo again. You'll see that the only part exposed is the tyre and a small part of the landing gear framework. Its also hard for water to get into the landing gear, and if it did, then it would only be a small enough amount to be of no harm. At most it would cause 2mm's layer of water which is nothing compared to the hydraulics of the powerful landing gear.

Wink

Pro Member Chief Captain
pilotwannabe Chief Captain

OK that explains that.....but what about the pressure of the tires. How can they stay pressurized at such an altitude??

Wink

P.S I'm determined too proove the 737 is unsafe Rolling Eyes Laughing

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Laughing

Pressure differential (between the tyres and atmosphere) resolves itself from takeoff to landing. When an aircraft takes off, the pressure within the tyre is a lot more than that of the outside which exerts pressure on the tyre wall. When the aircraft is cruising, the pressure in the atmosphere is more than the tyre so may contract the tyre slightly. When the aircraft descends, the reverse happens and you end up with a situation as on takeoff. In all, it is just the small amount of wear and tear a tyre takes.

Whilst we are on the topic, the gear well of any aircraft isn't pressurised as far as I know, so whether you have the gear tucked up in the belly of the plane with doors guarding it, or have the gear dangling 10 feet below you, the pressure will be the same - so with that statement, you are disproving the safety of any commercial aircraft Laughing

Next Question

Wink

Pro Member Chief Captain
pilotwannabe Chief Captain

Thanks Jon Wink .....I think i'll be able to sleep again tonight now Laughing

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

pilotwannabe wrote:

Thanks Jon Wink .....I think i'll be able to sleep again tonight now Laughing

ROFL

Cheers!

Pro Member Chief Captain
ceetee Chief Captain

Aren't the two letters the last two digits of the registration??

I.e. A virgin 747 with registration G-VXLG would have LG on the wheel well. I assume its becasue the LG part is the unique part of the registration....and so it can be identified quickly by ground crew etc.

That appears to be spot on!

Thanks everyone who answering my question! Laughing

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