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Flaps during take off

Pro Member Captain
Doyley Captain

Pilot's Penalty points: -300 points
Forgetting to set the proper flaps during take-off is an extremely dangerous fault and does not show proper piloting skills. (-300)

Ive had this happen to me several times now and im certain ive had the proper flaps set... It happens about 1/10 flights. Does this happen to anybody else?

Pro Member Chief Captain
jarred_01 Chief Captain

Well you say that you are sure you have your flaps set right, so there must be a problem with the flap mechanisms themselves. When you select the desired flap setting for TO, do you check that the flaps have actually moved to the setting you entered. (by looking at the gauges, etc).

Pro Member Captain
Doyley Captain

Yeah, ive got a panel different from the default...maybe thats it Sad

Pro Member Chief Captain
CrashGordon Chief Captain

If it will make you feel better, I used to get penalized for taking off in a Cessna 208 with no flaps. The Cessna site clearly says, the planemay take off without flaps.

Pro Member Captain
Doyley Captain

Ah well, its no biggy... its not going to put me off Very Happy

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Solotwo Chief Captain

I have that happen once in awhile even if I have the flaps set. What I'm starting to think is if you're setting your flaps WAY before you're close to your runway for takeoff I think it still thinks you have no flaps set when you take off. Thats just my guess because that seems to be the only time it gives me that penalty.

Pro Member Captain
Doyley Captain

I did some reading up on this on the fspassengers website. Apparently it checks the flaps etc a couple of seconds after take off. I think I was probably retracting the flaps too early.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Solotwo Chief Captain

Another thing I learned about FSP is pressurization. Apparently the new Baron 58 isn't pressurized and above 12,000 ft, even though its rated for over 20,000ft at about 13k is when all hell breaks loose and basically all your passengers die...

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Greekman72 Chief Captain
Don Wood Guest

SoloTwo: Actually, all hell does not break loose and your passengers don't begin to die at 13,000 feet. For healthy people, minor hypoxia does begin to set in at around that altitude and the effects become worse and potentially fatal as you continue to climb. Many a/c are capable of climbing into hypoxia altitudes that are not pressurized. To do so, they must be equipped with oxygen and, above certain levels, it must be used.

I no longer fly a/c that will not reach those rarified altitudes so I don't remember off-hand the altitudes at which oxygen use is required. It is required at a somewhat lower altitude (12,500 feet MSL?) for flight crew than it is for passengers. There is also a time restriction for flight crew to use oxygen if they are going to fly at a borderline altitude. I don't have the time now to look it up but anyone could do so by googling the US Federal Air Regulations and using their keyword search function for oxygen.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Don Wood wrote:

SoloTwo: Actually, all hell does not break loose and your passengers don't begin to die at 13,000 feet. For healthy people, minor hypoxia does begin to set in at around that altitude and the effects become worse and potentially fatal as you continue to climb. Many a/c are capable of climbing into hypoxia altitudes that are not pressurized. To do so, they must be equipped with oxygen and, above certain levels, it must be used.

I no longer fly a/c that will not reach those rarified altitudes so I don't remember off-hand the altitudes at which oxygen use is required. It is required at a somewhat lower altitude (12,500 feet MSL?) for flight crew than it is for passengers. There is also a time restriction for flight crew to use oxygen if they are going to fly at a borderline altitude. I don't have the time now to look it up but anyone could do so by googling the US Federal Air Regulations and using their keyword search function for oxygen.

Very interesting Don Thumbs Up! I think SoloTwo was referring to what happens in FS when using FsP above 13000 feet in the Beech Baron 58. One thing I would like to know, is can hypoxia be 'treated' or lose effect if you fly constantly for long periods of times, i.e. are there any airline pilots that would still suffer from hypoxia? Cheers!

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Solotwo Chief Captain

Well all I know is when I was around 14 to 15k feet everyone screamed and there terror level went up to 99% and I look at the in flight report and it said passengers are in critical condition and we need to land right away. Smile Around 12k was the limit, when flying there once in awhile a thing would pop up showing the pressurization fear, it would be at around 1% ish and deviate.

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