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A plane losing an engine

Pro Member Captain
Sean (SeanGa) Captain

Hi, I just read a news about a SAS MD80 plane which actually LOST its engine during flight. By lost I don't mean it malfunctioned, I mean the plane physically LOST the engine..

I am wondering, what would be the emergency procedures for this situation? Just apply aileron and rudder trim?

I know that the solution to the problem if the engine shuts down is to apply rudder trim so that the airplane doesn't drift to one side, but as the airplane has lost weight in addition to thrust, I guess aileron trim together with rudder trim would solve the problem?

Thanks in advance for any replies!

Btw, the plane landed safely at amsterdam schiphol!

edit: the source is in Norwegian, so I won't bother to post it here for obvious reasons.. if anyone is interested though, I can post it, but no pics or anything are included



Last edited by Sean (SeanGa) on Tue May 30, 2006 5:16 pm, edited 1 time in total

15 Responses

Pro Member Captain
Doyley Captain

On some planes engines are designed to break away if they become damaged and start to vibrate too much as this can cause severe damage to the wing.
Im not sure of the procedure of what to do if it happens though.

Pro Member Captain
Sean (SeanGa) Captain

that is very interesting doyley! I dunno if that was the case here though.. on the news page it only said: "the left engine loosened with a brawl and the plane immediately lost altitude and was tilting from side to side"

but the aircraft was of the type MD80, so the engines aren't attached to the wing.. dunno if the engines still have that mechanism you were talking about though

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

Bend over, grab you ankles and kiss you butt go bye...!!! These engines are mounted to the rear of the fusilage. If it is the same configuration as the DC9 then what happened when I was flying one may work. The pilot of course made a right hand turn to go back to the field to land. The pilot was a Marine Corps pilot and did not declare an emergency. We hardly felt the difference. The pilon released when pressure was put on it for takeoff. Being that this was a scheduled school flight that had to go. The mechanics put on another engine, certified it for flight and we were off the ground with in a hour and a half.

Pro Member First Officer
PH First Officer

Good thing on AC with tail mounted engines is there is not a great deal of assymetric thrust. Remaining thrust is pretty much in line with the fuselage. Still a concern as you will be unsure what damage has been caused to the tailplane etc but something that will have been practiced many times in the sim (engine out not engine off!) but similar flying characterisitcs.

Pro Member First Officer
Ryan Finn (pilotguy44) First Officer

edr1073 wrote: Bend over, grab you ankles and kiss you butt go bye...!!! These engines are mounted to the rear of the fusilage. If it is the same configuration as the DC9 then what happened when I was flying one may work. The pilot of course made a right hand turn to go back to the field to land. The pilot was a Marine Corps pilot and did not declare an emergency. We hardly felt the difference. The pilon released when pressure was put on it for takeoff. Being that this was a scheduled school flight that had to go. The mechanics put on another engine, certified it for flight and we were off the ground with in a hour and a half.

..what??!?!

i don't doubt your story edr1073 .. but I just find two things hard to believe here..
1.) Marine Pilot or not, an emergency should be declared immediately if you lose an engine!!
2.) I don't see how a completely new engine could be fitted and checked out within 90 minutes...

interesting story, nevertheless 😂

Pro Member Captain
Sean (SeanGa) Captain

pilotguy44 wrote:

edr1073 wrote: Bend over, grab you ankles and kiss you butt go bye...!!! These engines are mounted to the rear of the fusilage. If it is the same configuration as the DC9 then what happened when I was flying one may work. The pilot of course made a right hand turn to go back to the field to land. The pilot was a Marine Corps pilot and did not declare an emergency. We hardly felt the difference. The pilon released when pressure was put on it for takeoff. Being that this was a scheduled school flight that had to go. The mechanics put on another engine, certified it for flight and we were off the ground with in a hour and a half.

..what??!?!

i don't doubt your story edr1073 .. but I just find two things hard to believe here..
1.) Marine Pilot or not, an emergency should be declared immediately if you lose an engine!!
2.) I don't see how a completely new engine could be fitted and checked out within 90 minutes...

interesting story, nevertheless 😂

You don't see how a completely bew engine could be fitted and checked out within 90 minutes? dude that's easy.........

you just lift it up, strap it on with a rope and signalize to the pilot that he's ready for taxi. takes like 15 minutes MAX with retarted technicians/mechanics

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

I cannot explain the reasons for the actions, or the lack of I am just telling you what we were told. The Marine Corps like all DoD pilots answer to the DoD, DoN. There are containerized engines atleast at MCAS Cherry Point North Carolina there was at the SOES hanger awaiting to be installed.

The explaination we got was just as PH stated. The thrust remains to the center and is more controllable...????

Pro Member Captain
Sean (SeanGa) Captain

edr1073 wrote:

The explaination we got was just as PH stated. The thrust remains to the center and is more controllable...????

yes because the engines are closer to the plane than the engines in a jet with the engines on the wings.

but I guess since the engines are located at the far back of the A/C the engines' thrust do make rudder compensation necessary to a certain extent

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

Yes, I agree with you 100%. Maybe I just shouldn't have said anything about it. I know that it seems to be a little far fethced. A DC-10 lost an engine pilon back in the 80s. All would have been fine except for certain conditions such as the backup systems failing because of severed hydralic lines. Does anybody remember this?

Pro Member Chief Captain
CRJCapt Chief Captain

I do, here is the story:
http://www.airdisaster.com/investigations/aacrash.shtml

(Picture only to illustrate aircraft type, company involved was American Airlines.)
🙂

Pro Member First Officer
Jamie Robson (Jamier) First Officer

I remember that and also remember the 744 Cargo losing BOTH engines on its left wing i believe and destroyed 10ft of the leading edge, meaning that when the aircraft slowed below 280knots it banked hard and went down!

This was at Schipol, Amsterdam

Pro Member Chief Captain
hinch Chief Captain

md80 - mad dog - far too much power for it's own good. fuselage mounted...no worries with one engine there :p

in planes like the vc10 the engines are mounted by one bolt...

Pro Member First Officer
PH First Officer

Back to the beginning of the thread....aircraft transmitted losing an engine (SAS MD80) reporter jumped the gun.....engine failed and did not "fall off". Story amended!

Pro Member Captain
Doyley Captain

Jamier wrote:

I remember that and also remember the 744 Cargo losing BOTH engines on its left wing i believe and destroyed 10ft of the leading edge, meaning that when the aircraft slowed below 280knots it banked hard and went down!

This was at Schipol, Amsterdam

Yeah that was on seconds from disaster recently. One of the engines came loose due to metal fatigue and took out the other engine with it.

Pro Member First Officer
Ed Reagle (edr1073) First Officer

The dogone media it fgiures. When we need them to report the truth well they have to bend and shape it the way they want to be. I hope that none of the family members got the information, can the media claim insanity pleas...???

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