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Dumb Question?

Pro Member Trainee
fmpjb Trainee

I was just wondering how you tell when you are on the correct path for an airway, be it jet or victor? Is there an instrument(s) that will tell you?

sorry in advance about the dumb question.

Pro Member First Officer
JTH First Officer

Yes, it's called the ILS (Instrument Landing System).

Please see here for a description on how to use it: https://forum.flyawaysimulation.com/forum/topic/8080/ils-approach-guide-tutorial/

Pro Member Trainee
fmpjb Trainee

oh, i didn't mean correct path to land at a runway, i mean correct path to navigate an airway like J505, i.e. the highways of the sky.

thanks again

Pro Member First Officer
beerbadger First Officer

the NAV button on the AP press it and the flight director should come on, this shows you were you should be heading.

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

fmpjb wrote:

I was just wondering how you tell when you are on the correct path for an airway, be it jet or victor? Is there an instrument(s) that will tell you?

sorry in advance about the dumb question.

I think you mean specific pathways in the air. The FMC does it for you Wink I don't think you necessarily try and navigate your way so you are specifically on an airway and stay on it. You set a flightplan with the FMC and follow it using autopilot or GPS which uses computer technology to make sure you stay on course. So in short, you watch your FMC or GPS to see if your on a jet or victor airway Wink

Don Wood Guest

Airway segments are defined by one or more specific navigation fixes. Since I do not fly with GPS, I do not know if there are any GPS fixes that are used to define airways. Many airways are defined as being a specific radial from a specific VOR, VORTAC, or VOR/DME. The way you determine you are on the airway is to set the VOR to the correct frequency, dial in the correct radial on the OBS, and if your VOR navigation instrument (FMC or VOR indicator) shows you to be on course, then you are on the airway.

When you are actually flying the airway, the VOR radio should already be set as stated. You stay on the airway smply by keeping the VOR indicator centered until the VOR or radial defining the airway changes. All the airways are depicted on either sectionals, WACs, and IFR enroute charts for low altitude airways or IFR enroute charts for high altitude airways.

Pro Member Trainee
fmpjb Trainee

Don, do the charts have the proper VOR radial settings for each airway? thanks

Pro Member Chief Captain
Greekman72 Chief Captain

I had to make only a small comment.

There is no Dumb Questions my friend...
There are only dump people who think that they are gods and sometimes are sarcastics...ignore them....Keep asking anything you like Wink

Pro Member Chief Captain
Jonathan (99jolegg) Chief Captain

Don Wood wrote:

Airway segments are defined by one or more specific navigation fixes. Since I do not fly with GPS, I do not know if there are any GPS fixes that are used to define airways. Many airways are defined as being a specific radial from a specific VOR, VORTAC, or VOR/DME. The way you determine you are on the airway is to set the VOR to the correct frequency, dial in the correct radial on the OBS, and if your VOR navigation instrument (FMC or VOR indicator) shows you to be on course, then you are on the airway.

When you are actually flying the airway, the VOR radio should already be set as stated. You stay on the airway smply by keeping the VOR indicator centered until the VOR or radial defining the airway changes. All the airways are depicted on either sectionals, WACs, and IFR enroute charts for low altitude airways or IFR enroute charts for high altitude airways.

Firstly, that is the answer from the master so ignore my attempt Big Grin

I had to make only a small comment.

There is no Dumb Questions my friend...
There are only dump people who think that they are gods and sometimes are sarcastics...ignore them....Keep asking anything you like
Wink

Greekman is right, no post is a dumb post unless it is spam and pointless Thumbs Up! [/i]

Pro Member Captain
Bindolaf Captain

Hi fmpjb,

do a little search for "VOR" or "navigation" or "airway" in this forum. There have been quite a few posts recently on this subject with some really good explanations.

Don Wood Guest

fmpjb - Each chart that depicts an airway has the necessary information to define that airway. That includes the VOR on which that airway segment is based, the radio frequency for that VOR, the magnetic course or radial that defines the center of the airway, and the navigational fix that ends that segment. The end may be another VOR. It could also be some other type of navigational fix such as an intersection.

When I say an end, that does not mean that particular airway ends. It means the specific segment that is defined by two specific navigational points has ended. An airway is composed of many such segments to allow precise navigation.

A low level airway includes the airspace four miles on either side of the center line and from 1200 feet AGL to 18,000 feet. Airways are controlled airspace and, as such, require VFR weather minimums or an IFR flight plan to enter them.

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