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Torque/P-factor

Pro Member Trainee
Brook Trainee

Has anyone mastered good technique for overcoming the single-prop pull to the left?

I half suspect the real-life solution (right-rudder) is easier than the sim solution. I always try to set up to fly the most realistic conditions possible, but the left-pulling always gets so frustrating that I end up just turning off the torque & p-factor.

7 Responses

Pro Member Chief Captain
RadarMan Chief Captain

❓ What type of joystick are you using, that may be your problem.

Check this out.

https://forum.flyawaysimulation.com/forum/topic/660/saitek-stearing-to-left/

Pro Member Trainee
ronaldpatton Trainee

Right rudder is the correct answer. If you don't have rudder pedals, think about getting them. I have the CH pro pedals and they are great.

Pro Member Trainee
watersprite Trainee

ronaldpatton wrote:

Right rudder is the correct answer. If you don't have rudder pedals, think about getting them. I have the CH pro pedals and they are great.

Yes...they are great! Smile I have another question about this though...

Is it also proper to use, if a particular plane has it, the "rudder trim" adjustment to compensate for the left turning tendency created by torque?

Pro Member Trainee
ronaldpatton Trainee

The P factor is proporational to acceleration. Once you level off and reach crusie speed, it dimminishes to about zero. So, yes you can "trim" it out during takeoff and climb, but you will need to retrim in level cruise and decent. Also, in real flight, it is a bad idea because if you lose power abruptly while you are near the ground, you get the added bonus of an out of trim rudder 😳

Pro Member Trainee
Brook Trainee

I think where this challenges me most is on the takeoff roll. With realistic torque settings it's all I can do to stay off the grass. Experimenting last night I discovered that by setting up the take off on the right side of the runway I could let the plane pull to center, applying increasing right rudder to keep her centered.

I don't know if this is "correct" technique but it seemed like the beginning of a solution for me. Can anyone suggest how it's done by the book?

Pro Member Trainee
watersprite Trainee

Brook wrote:

I think where this challenges me most is on the takeoff roll. With realistic torque settings it's all I can do to stay off the grass. Experimenting last night I discovered that by setting up the take off on the right side of the runway I could let the plane pull to center, applying increasing right rudder to keep her centered.

I don't know if this is "correct" technique but it seemed like the beginning of a solution for me. Can anyone suggest how it's done by the book?

Since I'm only a simulated pilot, I can't be sure about how it's done "by the book". What I do if I know a plane will have a more severe left turning tendency on takeoff is to apply a bit of right rudder before I even begin to accelerate down the runway, then make small adjustments as I go. I don't think I'd recommend starting on the right side of the runway though. Just start in the center and apply your rudder adjustments as needed. Subtle adjustments seem to work better than more radical ones.

Also...the makers of some add-on aircraft I have are under the impression that the torque and P-factor settings are a bit too severe in the default "realism/hard" settings, and do not always reflect an "as real as it gets" situation. They recommend pulling those sliders a bit to the left (reduce severity).

Pro Member First Officer
leadfoot First Officer

The proper procedure for dealing with p factor is by applying right rudder. You should'nt have any trouble keeping the plane on the runway, all things being equal. However, if you have a crosswind, that poses a bigger problem. If the wind is from your left, you usually hane to add left aileron as well. As you gain speed, you need less and less aileron, and rudder. When you climb out you still need right rudder, just keep the ball centered on the turn co-ordinator and you should be fine. Also try throttling up a little slower. I usually turn the p-factor setting off when I fly the sim. When I fly for real I compensate for like it is second nature to me. I will say, I've heard it said that flying a simulator is harder than flting the real thing. I would recommend that all you sim pilots try the real thing a few times, it would vastly increase your understanding about flying.

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